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High School Teachers and Administrators

Are you new to Sapling Learning? Learn how to get started in your courses and get all of your questions answered here!

Trainings

While our system is very easy to use, everyone can benefit from a training.
The online training video series is very short and will empower you with the vital skills for using Sapling most effectively.

Reference Documents

Here is a handout to give your students on their first day using Sapling.

Here are two documents you may find helpful as a teacher.

  • Teacher Training Handout: This is a quick reference guide to Sapling features for Teachers. It would be helpful to follow along with this when watching the Online Training Videos or when attending a Sapling Training Webinar.
  • EOC Prep Guide: This gives you some basic steps and information on how to effectively use your Sapling EOC Prep courses in your class.

Still have questions?

Most of your questions can be answered here on the Teacher Help page. All help topics can be found in the right side panel. Here you will find links containing instructions, screenshots, and even videos demonstrating features in Sapling. You can drill down to more detailed information by clicking on the plus sign to the right of the Help Topic.

If you’re still having trouble or need questions answered, please contact your TechTA. TechTAs are available by phone or email M-F from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm CST.  If you don't know your TechTA's contact info, email teacherhelp@saplinglearning.com.

 

Welcome to our online training page. Here you can watch a recorded webinar of a training or find some videos about specific topics.

 

Training on Demand

This 30 minute training video is designed for EOC Biology Prep and TEKS Mastery users. It provides an overview of Sapling Learning, how to log in, the components included in your course, viewing statistics and grades, managing students, and exporting grades.  

Hide/Show Pieces of Your Course

You may find it useful to hide and show things to students. This feature locks students out of areas until you are ready for them to be seen.  

Adding Resources

You will probably find it valuable to upload your own notes, presentations, handouts, and more.  

Ready to Begin?

  • Download the presentation for the current topic you are wanting to teach and use it in your next lecture.
  • Distribute your students' logins and have them take the practice using Sapling Learning assignment. 
  • As students complete more assignments track their progress through the automatic grading feature.
  • If you have any questions reach out to your Tech TA
  • Enjoy your experience with Sapling Learning. 

To access your course, you will need to log in with your username and password. Logging in takes you to the landing page, on which you can enter any course you teach. View the getting started video* below for more information.

The first time you log in, you may wish to change your password. Remember that this password allows access to modify the course and view the grade book. Please memorize this password or keep a hardcopy well secured. If you forget your password, you can request a new one from your Tech TA. 

As a teacher, you can change your password at any time. This is accessed on the profile page. To get here, click your name in the top right corner of any page. 

  1. At the bottom of this page, click .
  2. You will be taken to a new page where you can change your password.
  3. In the first box, type your current password (the one you want to change).
  4. In the second and third boxes, type your new password (the one you want to change to).
  5. When finished, click .
Sapling Learning provides you a course; a website that has the ability to function as your class' learning portal. All of your notes, presentations, handouts, homework, and grades can reside here, easily accessible to all of your students- at school and at home. This course is comprised of "pieces" of information. The course you receive is pre-made and ready to use, but easily customized. A sample course is overviewed below. A video of this same information is at the bottom of this page.     A) Left Menu - Links to lists of all your activities, forums, resources and all the housekeeping tools (grade book and course management). B) Course Content - Where all of the content specific to your course loads. This is where you can make changes. C) Upcoming Events - When an activity's due date is approaching, a direct link to it will automatically appear here. D) Quick Links - Navigational links viewable only to you. You can jump to units of your textbook, STAAR assignments, or the TEKS assignments. E) Teacher Tips - Reminders of some of the advanced features to ensure Sapling Learning is customized to your needs. F) Freesources - Links to Sapling's curated Freesource list organized by subject and topic.    Take a moment to glance over your course and then take a look at the pieces comprising it.    

Video Overview

 

Your course is created by arranging numerous pieces of content. Remember that the bulk of this has been done for you already, but knowing how the course was assembled will allow you to alter it. All pieces except labels (text) will be indicated by an icon.

Resources 

These resources allow you to link to anywhere on the web or upload your own personal files. Please respect copyright notices on content you do not own. The icon automatically appears depending on what kind of file you uploaded or linked to. (For step by step instructions on how to add a resource click here.)

Activities 

These are playlists of Sapling Learning's questions. They can be configured to change feedback ability, grading policies, and start/due dates. When you click on one, you are taken to the activity editor. When a student clicks on one, they will be taken to the first question.

Some differences exist between our flash-based activities (indicated by the leaf icon ) and our mobile-friendly activities (indicated by the tablet icon ). Throughout these help pages, we'll distinguish available features in the different assignment types where applicable. Note that we have phased out the "Quiz" type of activity denoted by a Q icon. However, if you need assistance with a legacy Quiz activity, please see the Quiz help.

Forums  

These are places where students can chat with one another or you. Forums can be utilized to post news, hold Q&A sessions, or have class discussions. To learn more details about forums click here.

Labels  (no icon)

These are chunks of text which can be used to label areas on your course site. Many of these have already been created for you. If you'd like to add text on the main page for students to immediately see, this is what you want to use. If it's going to be a lot of text, you probably want to compose a text page (a type of resource).

The Resources page of your course shows a listing all the non-assignment links in your course, such as lessons, presentations, and study sheets.  To add additional resources, such as a syllabus, see Posting Files or Links, or watch the video below.

 

The Additional Resources page is a compilation of all the ancillary materials for your dynamic course. In math courses, this page also contains printable versions of the assignments.

  1. Look in the right-side margin of your course page, and scroll down you'll see a block labeled Teacher Resources.
  2. Under the Teacher Resources heading, click the link for Additional Resources.

The forum already built into your course is: Course Discussion. You can also create new forums.

Course Discussion Forum 

The Course Discussion Forum is a place for students to discuss topics being taught in class with one another (or you).
After editing has been turned on, any piece or unit of your course can be hidden.


Hiding a piece of your course is a convenient way to focus your students on what is only currently necessary for their success. Please note that they can NOT access hidden content. This includes activities with upcoming due dates. If you want students to complete an activity, it must be shown.

Hidden pieces are still visible to you, but they will be grayed out. Hidden units will have everything grayed out in them.  

Video Instructions

 

Text Instructions

Hide Pieces 

  1. Click the open eye icon () next to any currently shown piece.
  2. The course will reload and the piece should be grayed out. The icon next to it will now be a closed eye ().
  3. When viewed as a student, the piece will be gone.

Show Pieces

  1. Click the closed eye icon ( ) next to any currently hidden piece.
  2. The course will reload and the piece should be grayed out. The icon next to it will now be an open eye ().
  3. When viewed as a student, the piece will be visible.

Hide Units

  1. Click the open eye icon () in the top right of any currently shown unit.
  2. The course will reload and everything in the unit be grayed out. The icon in the top right and beside every piece inside the unit will now be a closed eye ().
  3. When viewed as a student, the unit will simply say "Not available."

Show Units

  1. Click the closed eye icon () in the top right of any currently hidden unit.
  2. The course will reload and everything in the unit will return to its original availability. The icon in the top right will now be an open eye ().
  3. When viewed as a student, the content in the unit will be visible (unless individually hidden earlier/later).
Note about hiding/showing units: When units are hidden, this overlays on top of the individual settings for each piece. For example, a hidden piece in a unit that is hidden and then shown will still be hidden.

After editing has been turned on, all pieces in your course can be moved anywhere in the course area. If you want to move a unit at a time, you should use the up/down arrows on the right of each unit.

Video Instructions

 

Text Instructions

Moving Pieces

  1. Next to the piece that you wish to move, click the move icon ().
  2. The course will reload will dashed boxes () between every piece of content. Click the box where you want to move the content.
  3. The course will reload and the piece of content will have moved.
If you decide that you no longer want to move the piece of content, click the "Cancel" link at the very top of your course, above our logo.

 

Moving Units

  1. In the top right corner of any unit, click the arrow ( or ) that points the direction you want to move the block. 
  2. The course will reload and the unit will have moved one block this direction.

Activities are the heart of Sapling Learning. This is where students interact with our automatically-graded questions. While many assignments have come pre-made for you, you will probably find it useful to edit the activities. Click on any activity () to open the activity editor.

Video Overview

Text Overview

Below is a main overview of the features in the activity editor. Pages explaining some of these features in more depth can be accessed from the far right column. Please note that any change you make to the activity saves instantly. The undo and redo arrows are along the top row of icons.


Activity Settings 

These are found at the top of the activity editor, above the playlist of questions.

Name  Image/Icons  Summary
Hide/Show      

A shortcut of the same hide/show feature used for any piece of your course

Edit Settings   Click the edit settings icon to change the name of an activity or change any other setting such due date or activity type.
Available / Due Allows you to lock students out of an activity until the start date (available from) and also once the due date passes. Extensions can be granted to certain students or class periods. Read more.
Points Possible   Lets you set the maximum number of points. This reflects the weight the activity has in the grade book. 
Grade Category Dedicates where the activity shows up in the grade book (tests, homework, etc.) and thus how a student's grade on the activity affects their total grade. 
Description  Description: Text that students can see below their activity. (We have noticed most students do not scroll down and read this text. It's a good idea to go over anything important about an activity in class.)
Policies   Sets the grading policy (how many attempts students receive, if they can see the solution, how many points are taken off for each attempt, etc.). You can view the parameters of each setting by clicking the magnifying glass icon next to the dropdown. Read more


Shortcuts 

These are found in the top icon bar of the activity editor.
 

Title Image/Icon Summary
Undo/Redo

  

Toggles back and forward among your changes.
Preview   Loads the activity as a student will see it. Since you are the teacher, it does not save your answers or grades. 
Grades   Shortcut to your grade book. 
Stats   Shortcut to this activity's statistics (avg. score, number of attempts, etc.) 
Help   Shortcut to Sapling Learning's internal help files on the activity editor. 
 Locate   Locates the question in the Library.

Rearranging Your Activity 

You can move, remove, add, and sort questions in your activity. Please visit this page for an in-depth look at these features.

Creating Your Own Activity 

You can create your own activity from scratch rather than editing an existing Sapling activity. If you wish to learn how to create your own activity click here.

If you do not set "available from" and "due date" then students can enter any visible assignment and begin working. If you want to control the sequence, you can set these times.

A good general rule of thumb is to make any assignments with both "due" and "available from" dates visible to students. This allows students to know what will be expected of them but keep them on pace. Please note: activities will NOT automatically change from hidden to shown when the available from date passes.
  1. On the right side of the Activity Editor page for any assignment, click on the paper and pencil icon under the blue settings bar. This will expand and allow you to edit settings for this assignment.
  2. Click on the check box under the words Due Date.
    3. Set the due date, hour, and minute for the assignment to be due. You can type in a date, or choose a date by clicking the calendar. Please note that the times are in 24 hour format.
  3. Click the save button ()to set the due date. If any of your students have already worked on the activity, there will be a slight delay as their due dates are updated. You can continue to edit other settings on the activity (other than "Due Date" or "Points Possible") while this process is completed.
Note that this is NOT required for students to begin. It functions to locks the students until a certain date and time.
 
  1. On the right side of the Activity Editor page for any assignment, click on the paper and pencil icon under the blue settings bar. This will expand and allow you to edit settings for this assignment.
  2. Click on the check box under the words Available From.
  3. Set the due date, hour, and minute for the assignment to be due. You can type in a date, or choose a date by clicking the calendar. Please note that the times are in 24 hour format.
  4. Click the Save button ()to set the due date. 
Please note: activities will NOT automatically change from hidden to shown when the available from date passes.

Setting a due date for an activity will automatically create a reminder in the "Upcoming Events" block in the top right corner of the main course page if the due date is within 2 weeks. It also adds the activity to the course calendar. You can access the full calendar by clicking the "Go to calendar" link in the "Upcoming Events" block.

You can also add other reminders for your class by clicking "New Event..." in the "Upcoming Events" block.

You will then be asked to select the Type of Event. Select Course Event. Then click OK.

The screen will then refresh and appear similar to the screen shot below.

1. Enter the announcement's name and description. (The "name" will be displayed in the "Upcoming Events" block as a link to the calendar where the "description" is displayed.)
2. Below the description enter the Date and time you would like your announcement to appear.
3. Enter the Duration of the announcement.
4. If this will be an event that Repeats, select "Repeat weekly, creating altogether ___ events". Enter the number of weeks the announcement should repeat.
5. Click Save changes.

If you need to edit a calendar event after it has been created:


1. Enter the calendar and select the event you would like to edit.
2. Click on the icon that looks like a pencil and paper in the bottom right corner.

If you need to delete a calendar event:

1. Enter the calendar and select the event you would like to delete.
2. Click on the red "x"  in the bottom right corner.
3. You will be asked to confirm that you want to delete the event. Click Delete.

For flash (non-mobile) assignments, you can adjust due dates and available dates for individual students or groups of students. When adjusting the due date, we call it an extension. When adjusting the available date, we call it an offset. Extensions/offsets for mobile assignments are not yet possible.

If you need to give a student or a group of students more time to finish an assignment, you can grant them a per-assignment due date extension. If the same set of students will always need more time (for example, a class period that meets the next day) then you can set a course-wide group extension. For more information, see Extensions/Offsets and Group Extensions/Offsets.

To preview a question, enter the Activity Editor by clicking on an activity. Once inside the Activity Editor, double click on the title of any question in the playlist or library to generate a preview of that question.

By creating a new activity, you can target your students on just the material you are teaching for a specific length of time. For example, some teachers use this feature to create warm-up quizzes, weekly homework, or extension activities for extra credit.  

1. Turn editing on by clicking the button in the top right of the course. The page will reload.

2. Find the block that you want your new activity to appear in. Select an option from the Add an activity... drowpdown menu. The Mobile Assignment option is our new platform, which allows students to complete assignments on a desktop, laptop, tablet, or smartphone.

3. This will bring you to a screen where you can enter the name, description, grading mode, availability and due dates of the activity. If you'd like, you can simply set the name of the assignment and edit the rest later. Once you have selected your desired settings, click the Save and Continue button at the bottom of the screen.

4. This will bring you to the Activity Editor. Because your new activity is blank, you will need to open the library to add and search for questions.

If a student doesn't have internet access, or for some reason needs their Sapling Activities printed, rather than completing them online, you can print that student's assignments, then you or the student can input those answers later. The following instructions will walk you through how to print a specific assignment for a student.  It will populate questions with the values the student will see it when completing the assignment online.    Due to the algorithms in the system, not all students will see every question with the same content, so teachers cannot print one set of assignments and then copy them for the whole class. They must be printed individually for specific students.

1. Click on the Grade Book Icon
2. Click the student's numeric grade for that assignment. (If the student has not begun the activity then click on the --)
3. From the top of the question preview panel click print
4. Choose whether you want to print the entire assignment or print the current item (only that question).

  • The assignment on your computer will show the solution to each problem. This will not show up on the printed assignment. 

5.​ Follow any additional on-screen prompts (these will depend on your computer's printing settings.)

If you have access to the students username and password you can also follow these instructions to print a specific assignment.

1. Sign in as the student with their username and password.
2. Navigate to the desired activity.
3. Click print.

You can reach your grade book by clicking "Grades" from the left menu.

This will bring you to the grade book for the entire course.

If you share a course and/or have multiple class periods, you will probably want to narrow down your grade book. Simply select which group you wish to look at from the drop down reproduced below.

This tool allows you to look at an itemized grade report for one student at a time.
1. Click "User Report" under the tabs in the middle of the page.

2. Select the student you wish to view from the drop down on the far right. 

The order of assignments in the grade book can be rearranged to minimize scrolling.

  1. From the grade book, , click the Categories and Items tab near the top of the page. 
  2. You will see a list of the assignments in the grade book with icons next to them. Click the green "move" arrows for the assignment or folder of assignments you wish to move. (The system will behave as it does when you move things up or down the main page.) 
  3. Click the box that is placed where you want your selection to move to. When the page refreshes, the assignments should be in their new order. This will be the order reflected in the grade book.

Your grade depends on how well you do on Sapling activities (assignments). Therefore, it is important that you know how to use the resources available to you inside the activities. Please read below to get a general idea about how questions work.

 

 

To help your students throughout the year, we've made a reference guide for you to offer them. This covers the basics that students need to know about Sapling Learning. You can download it here.  

Your Students' Logins

After your order, your courses, teachers, and students are created and enrolled. You or your science coordinator should receive an ExcelTM document that holds all of the usernames and passwords for your school/district. Generally there is a simple pattern that created for each district in terms of student username format. We do this for two reasons. First, we want to make the login experience simple for the students. Second, we need to ensure that all student usernames are unique across all of our logins. Once you receive the student login information you can either distribute the usernames and logins to your students by printing out the file or many teachers just inform students of the pattern associated with their district and students are able to log in right away. 

If you need help with student logins, please contact your Tech TA. They will have the ability to find lost logins, reset passwords, or create new logins if you have unused logins on your account. 

Sapling Learning groups allow your grade book to be organized by class period. When delivered, the numbering of your class periods may not match the periods you are teaching. This can easily be changed at any time.

1. Inside your course, click groups from the course management icon on the left menu

2. Select the group you'd like to edit in the box on the left.
3. Click  underneath the box.
4. At the top of the page, change the number at the end of the group name to the class period these students are enrolled in.
5. Click Save Changes at the bottom of the page.
6. You may wish to change your Excel sheet to reflect these changes.

By having students change their name, your grade book will populate with their names instead of a generic account number. You can also have students change their ID number. If both of these are done, it is easier to export grades into your district's grade book.

We suggest making this a "first day" activity for students learning to use Sapling. These steps are given from the point of view of a student. You can play the video below for them, or print a handout document for your students.  

Video Instructions

Text Instructions

  1. Log into Sapling Learning with the username and password given to you.
  2. Click on your current name in the top right which should look something like this. 
  3. Open the "Edit Profile" tab
  4. Change your first and last name to your name.
  5. Scroll down to type in your student ID number if your school uses ID numbers.
  6. Click "Update Profile" at the bottom.
  7. Return to the main page by clicking the Sapling Learning logo in the top left.


If you need to edit a student's identification information in the future you have the ability to do so using the Participants page.

As a teacher, you have the ability to edit student identification data and reset passwords using the participants page. To get to the Participants page:

  1. Click Participants under course management on the left side of your course's main page.
  2. This will bring you to the Participants page which will allow you to edit students' first and last names, ID numbers and passwords, as well as see when students last accessed the course.

You can sort and control the users which show up in the participants list using the drop down menus at the top of the page.

  • The "My courses" drop-down menu will allow you to view students by subject (if you teach more than one subject or level of a subject.) 
  • The "Separate groups" drop-down menu allows you to view students by class period.
  •  The "Inactive for more than" drop-down menu allows you to view students who have been inactive on the site for a specific amount of time. This tool can be used to help you quickly monitor your students and find those who may need help logging in.

You now have the ability to reset a student's password if they forget it! 

1. From the Participants page, click Reset in the Password column (in the row that corresponds to the student who needs the reset.)

2. By default, a new password is suggested. This suggestion is unique to you, but remains constant. In other words, if you reset the passwords for ten students, they will all have the same initial password. You can also use the text box to type a different password.

3. Copy the password in the text box and give it to the student.
4. Click OK to save the change. A box will appear notifying you that the change was successful. Click continue to return to the Participants page.

When you first receive your course, if you did not elect to send in your rosters, your classes will be populated with generic account names which you will then assign to your students. You have the ability to edit student identification information in the system so that students' real first and last names will be shown in the grade book, etc. (directions below.) To save time, you can also have students change their own information when they login.

Edit First and Last Names 

1. From the Participants page, click the edit icon next to that student's current name (located in the First name/Last name column).
2. This will open a text box that will allow you to edit the name. 
3. When you are finished editing, click the blue save icon. Note: Changing a user's first and last name will not change their username (Usernames cannot be edited). Editing first and last names will only change the way the user's name appears within the site and in your gradebook.

1. From the Participants page, click the edit icon next to ID number you want to edit (located in the ID number column.)
2. This will open a text box that will allow you to edit the number.
3. When you are finished editing, click the blue save icon.

You may wish to deactivate or activate users throughout the course of the school year as students are added or removed from your courses. Adding and removing users can be accomplished using the Participants page.

1. From the Participants page, find the user you wish to remove from your course. 
2. In the row of the user you wish to remove, click the Remove button in the "Remove from course" column of the list.

3. You will be asked to confirm the unenrollment. Click OK.
4. The user will then appear under the title "Former Students"  at the bottom of the page.


5. To add a student back to the course that has previously been removed, check the box in the "Select" column.
6. Click the Add Selected Users button at the bottom of the page.

To move a student between periods, you must remove the student from one group and add them to another.

  1. From your main course page, click or hover your mouse over Course Management.
  2. In the menu that appears to the right of your cursor, click Groups.
  3. Click on the name of an existing group and click Add/remove users.
    Groups page with an example group selected.
  4. In the “Existing members” box on the left, click the name(s) of the users that you’d like to remove from the group.
    Existing members box with a student's name highlighted
  5. With at least one existing member selected, click the Remove button.
  6. Click Back to groups to return to the groups page. 
  7. In the “Potential members” box on the right, click the name(s) of the users that you’d like to add to the group. Use shift+click or ctrl+click to select multiple users. Use the search box at the bottom to locate a particular user by name or email (or click Show all to clear your search).
    Search box with example search "albert" and search results "Student Albert Einstein (0)".
  8. With at least one potential member selected, click the Add button.
    Potential members box with two names highlighted.

Note that a given student may be placed into multiple groups if necessary for gradebook-sorting purposes. However, to successfully apply due date extensions for all students in a group, each student must be in only one group.

Question authoring is not yet available to teachers for mobile-friendly assignments. However, we are proud to offer the ability for you to edit our questions or write your own in our older flash-based system. Note that students can only view flash assignments on a desktop or laptop, not on a mobile device. Also note that an assignment must contain all flash-based questions, or all mobile-friendly questions (a given assignment cannot contain a mixture of both types).

Any questions that you write or edit will be available in any future courses you teach, but are private to only you and your students.

Modules

Tabs

FAQ

Mobile assignments may be done on a desktop, a laptop, or a mobile device such as a phone or a tablet. These assignments have an icon of a tablet  next to their name.

Navigation

Click on a question number on the left side to jump to any question within the assignment. You may also use the right and left arrow buttons < > at the top.

Hint / Feedback

Click the HINT button to see a helpful tip before answering a question.

 

After entering a wrong answer, the button will change to display FEEDBACK based on the answer you gave. To close the hint or feedback window, click the X in the upper-right corner of the popup window.

Check Answer / Resume

The CHECK ANSWER button is found at the bottom right of the page.

  

When reviewing past attempts, this button will instead say RESUME. Click RESUME to resume answering questions and the button will return to it's original function of CHECK ANSWER.

Attempts

If you make more than one attempt on a question, you can review those attempts by clicking the arrow buttons < > before or after the attempt indicator in the upper-right corner of the assignment.

Give up

If you would like to see the solution to a question f(this forfeiting your ability to continue answering for more points) you may choose to do so by clicking the GIVE UP button. You will need to confirm this choice by clicking YES, GIVE UP. in the subsequent popup window.

All the tools you will need to create your question can be found in the toolbar at the top of the screen.

Icon Name Action Embedded Tools
Text Entry This is the tool you will use to create the majority of your text. Whatever text you enter in this type of box will be "static." Static text is unchangeable by students and ungraded. Text Entry Tools

Graded Text Entry

The Graded Text Module creates a text box that can be filled in by the student and then graded. This is similar to a traditional fill-in-the-blank question. Graded Text Entry Tools
 Graded  Numeric  Entry The Graded Numeric Entry Module creates a numeric entry box that can be filled in by the student and then graded. Numeric Entry Tools
 Multiple  Choice  Module The Multiple Choice Module creates a multiple choice template that can then be filled in by the teacher. Multiple Choice Tools
   Symbolic  Equation The Symbolic Equation Module supports a wide range of mathematical symbols and functions. It can be used for static display or graded entry. Symbolic Equation Tools
   Animation  and Image The Animation and Image Module can be used to upload image files and display them. The module supports both JPEG and SWF image formats. Files of up to 100 kB can be uploaded. For Flash files (SWF), both static and dynamic images are supported. (Note: IBIS cannot display background color in SWF files.) Animation/ Image Tools
 Graph The Graph Module allows teachers to create graphs which can be either static or graded. Graph Tools
 Static Table The Static Table Module is meant for static display of data. It has no interactivity for students and cannot be used for graded input. Static Table Tools

 

 Static Bar  Graph The Static Bar Graph Module is meant for static display of data. It has no interactivity for students and cannot be used for graded input. Bar Graph Tools
 

 

 Static Pie  Chart The Static Pie Chart Module is meant for static display of data. It has no interactivity for students and cannot be used for graded input. Pie Chart Tools
 Chemical  Equation The Chemical Equation Module supports special formatting and symbols used in chemical equations, such as multi-level subscripts and stacked superscripts and subscripts for nuclear chemistry. It can be used for static display or for graded entry. Chemical Equation Tools
 2-D  Molecule The 2-D Molecule Module is used to draw static or graded two-dimensional molecules. The molecule editor provides tools for drawing different atoms, bonds, nonbonding electrons, charges, and reaction symbols. Students can be graded according to various tasks, such as selecting an atom and drawing molecules. 2-D Molecule Tools

 

 3-D  Molecule The 3–D Molecule Module can be used to upload PDB files (from ChemDraw and other sources) and display them in IBIS. The module can be static, interactive, or graded. 3-D Molecule Tools
 Orbital  Diagram The Orbital Diagram Module enables you to grade student-drawn atomic orbitals. Orbital Diagram Tools

 
 Vector  Diagram The Vector Diagram Module is used to draw static or graded vector diagrams. The Vector Diagram Tools
 Sorting The Sorting Module allows you to create matching questions in which students will sort items into categories. Sorting Module Tools

To save new information you have entered into a tab simply switch tabs and it will be saved automatically.

Enter the number, click  in the Tools menu and then enter the exponent number. For example, to enter 3.90 x 102, first enter "3.90" then click  and enter "2."

Click the right arrow key or place the cursor on the main line and click. The IBIS equation editor allows for entry of multi-tiered superscripts and subscripts; thus, the superscript button does not act as a toggle, as it does in most word processors.

Tolerance is the degree of difference accepted as approximately accurate within a problem (due to rounding, significant figures, case sensitivity, etc.) Tolerances can be set in Correct and Incorrect tabs. Options for tolerance vary with the module. To set a tolerance, click on the module in a Correct or Incorrect tab to open the tolerance options.

1. Click the + button (at the top right hand corner) to add an Incorrect tab. Move directly to that tab from the correct tab, copying the correct answers.
2. Select the module that you want to specifically address. Click on the eye icon . This will cause a red x to appear over the eye "blinding" it .

If the student enters the correct answer for every module except the one you "turned a blind eye to" he or she will receive this feedback.

If you are trying to cut/ copy/ paste an image directly into an question, IBIS will not let you. You must use the image tool  to upload images.

If you are having trouble with keyboard shortcuts for cut, copy, or pasting text in to a text box in IBIS, try releasing the X, C, or V key before releasing the Ctrl key. In Flash (IBIS is Flash-based), you must first release the key Ctrl modifies. For example, if you want to copy something, you have to press Ctrl, then press C, then release C, and then release Ctrl.

No. IBIS does not grade students on entering the correct number of significant figures in the Numeric Entry module. However, algorithmically-generated variables calculate and display in correct significant figures.

  • Activity - A "playlist" of questions which can be assigned for students to complete.
  • Activity Editor - The place where teachers can edit the content of Activities by adding, removing, or changing questions in the "playlist".
  • Algorithmic variable - A number, word, or phrase that is randomly generated by the system from a set of author-defined parameters.
  • Courseware - Software developed for instructional purposes.
  • Drop-down - A case-specific menu of options from which a user may select.
  • E-book - An electronic version of a book.
  • Force Download - A setting which causes a document to download automatically to a computer when a link is clicked.
  • Forum - A place where students can chat to one another or to you.
  • Graded - A type of question module that can be answered by a student and then graded.
  • Groups - A set of students grouped together to make looking for information easier. Typically students will be grouped by class period.
  • IBIS - The question authoring platform used by Sapling.
  • Label - A chunk of text which can be used to label areas on your course site. Labels are non-interactive.
  • Legend - A list of symbols or abbreviations accompanying a graphic representation.
  • Library - A collection containing all of the questions for your course arranged by topic in your book. 
  • Link -  An icon or piece of text which has a hyperlink embedded. When you click on a link it will take you to the website or document that the text or icon has been hyperlinked to.
  • Mainline fraction - Alphabetical and numeric values positioned centrally within a sentence, equation, or other unit of syntax--that is, neither stacked nor subscripted nor superscripted.
  • Module - Interface objects used in IBIS to make entries.  Modules are designed with tools and capabilities appropriate to their function. All answer spaces are modules.
  • Pieces -Your course is created by arranging numerous "pieces" of content. Pieces include: resources, activities, forums, and labels.
  • Playlist - A list of questions that will be "played" or given to students when they select an activity.
  • Resources - Allow you to link to anywhere on the web or upload your own personal files (PDF, Word, PowerPoint, etc.) 
  • Static - A type of module that is not interactive and therefore can not be graded. Static modules are only used to provide extra information.
  • Subscribe (to a forum) - A forum setting that automatically emails a copy of every post in a forum to subscribers.
  • Tab - A tabbed page used in IBIS to present feedback to students. Authors enter feedback for various answer type, e.g., correct, incorrect, and these are presented to students depending on their answer.
  • Tolerance - A degree of difference accepted as approximately accurate within a problem.
  • Toolbar - A line of shortcuts to specific functions within the software.
  • Winked - Hidden from students. When items are winked, the eye icon will appear closed and all text will be grayed out in teacher view.

Email your Tech TA. They will reset it for you.

You now have the ability to reset students' passwords! Click here to find out how!

Email your Tech TA! If you let us know that you want to keep your course the same, we can delete old student accounts and repopulate the course with new logins (rather than creating a new course for the next school year.)

If you have students with IEP's that require extra time for assignment completion, you can use Sapling's extension feature to grant individual students extensions, but only on non-mobile assignments. Extensions for mobile-friendly assignments are coming soon, but are not yet available. For other IEP related issues, please contact your Tech TA to find a suitable solution.

There are several ways to navigate this issue. Here are some of our suggestions.

1. Give your students plenty of time to complete their assignment by setting the available from and due dates far enough apart to give them a chance to make arrangements to go to your school's computer lab, library, or public library to use the internet.
2. Schedule class time in your school's computer lab for your students to complete their assignment.
3. Print or have your students print their assignment at school. Students can work the assignment on paper at home and then return to the computer lab at school to enter their answers into the system and receive feedback. This will dramatically cut down internet time but still allow students to receive the full benefits of Sapling.

In most browsers, you can type Ctrl+Shift+Del to skip straight to the cache options. Or, you can follow the steps below for your browser type.

Chrome

  1. Click the brower settings icon button in the top right corner of your browser.
  2. Choose Tools > Clear browsing data.
  3. Make sure the option to Empty the cache is checked and choose from the beginning of time from the dropdown menu.
  4. Click Clear browsing data.

Internet Explorer

  1. Click Tools in the upper right corner of the browser. This button may appear as a gear icon.
  2. Choose Internet Options.
  3. Click Delete... in the Browsing history section of the General tab.
  4. Make sure that Temporary Internet files and website files is checked.
  5. Click Delete.

Firefox

  1. Click History in the toolbar at the top.
  2. Choose Clear Recent History.
  3. Make sure the Cache box is checked (if you don’t see that option click Details) and set the timeframe to Everything.
  4. Click Clear now.

Safari

  1. Click Preferences.
  2. Choose Privacy.
  3. Click Remove all website data.

You cannot print mobile assignments directly, but you can access a printable version of the original template assignment via Additional Resources.

Switch role to student

To see your course page as students would see it,

  1. Expand the Switch role to... menu at the top right of the page. 
  2. Then select the Student option.
  3. Click Return to my normal role in the upper right corner to go back to instructor mode.

Important notes

  • The work you complete while in the student role will only be visible to you while in student mode.
  • To clear out any work you've done on an assignment as student, return to your normal instructor role, open the assignment, and double-click on any question to preview it. Edits made to the assignment will also clear out any work you did on that assignment while in the student role.
  • Features available to your simulated student role that are not available to real students include (1) the Return to Activity Editor button within assignments, which switches you back to instructor role and (2) the ability to open to hidden assignments via the gradebook. Real students cannot do either of those things.

This menu contains information on eTextbooks.

New reader (beta)

Sapling will be switching to a new eTextbook platform sometime in 2016. Instructors, if you would like to check out the new platform in its beta state, please contact your TechTA and they can insert a preview link into your course page.

There are several ways to navigate within the eTextbook. To navigate forward or backwards in single page steps, you can use your left and right arrow keys on your keyboard. Alternatively, you can use the PREVIOUS PAGE or NEXT PAGE buttons located at the top corners of each page.
Previous page and Next page 

The numbers in the top bar represent pages of the current chapter.  The current page is highlighted. Click a page number to jump directly to that specific page. Each underlined page number corresponds to the first page of a section. Hover your mouse over an underlined page number to see the name of the section that starts on that page.
Page numbers with current page highlighted, and section number tool tip.

 The right and left pointers allow you to scroll to access additional page numbers, if present.
Right and left pointers for scrolling the page numbers list.

Click the chapter number at the far right to go to the first page of the next chapter. Similarly, click the chapter number at the far left to go to the first page of the previous chapter.

To navigate to a specific chapter, click on the arrow next to the chapter title.  This will switch the navigation bar from page mode to chapter mode. Now the numbers and/or letters represent chapters, with the current chapter highlighted in orange. Hover your mouse over any of the chapter icons to see the title of that chapter. Click a chapter number to jump to the first page of that chapter. If there are more chapters than can fit horizontally, use the right and left pointer buttons to scroll.  To return the navigation bar to page mode, click the number for the current chapter, which is highlighted in orange.

Skim option at top-right of page below the chapter number.Skim mode allows you to scan through thumbnail images of each page of the current chapter and jump to a desired page. To enter skim mode for the current chapter, click on the Skim button on the right side of the navigation bar. If you don't see this button, you may need to increase the width of your browser window. A popup will open showing thumbnail images of the pages of the current chapter, with the current page being shown in the center of the view. You may use your keyboard’s arrow keys, drag the slider bar, or use any left-right mouse scrolling functionality to scan through the thumbnail images.
 

When you find the image of the desired page, click on that thumbnail image and you will be taken directly to that page. If you would like to remain on the current page, click anywhere outside of the skim-mode popup window.

Search bar is directly under Notes, Bookmarks, HighlightsYou can search for any word or phrase contained in the book or your notes. Type a word or phrase into the search bar on the left, then press the Enter key on your keyboard. Search results are not case sensitive.

Your search results will be categorized by where they are found; Table of contents, Book text, Notes, or Highlights.

Table of Contents

If the search text is found within a chapter or section title, the search result is shown in the Table of Contents section. Clicking on Table of Contents will show all of the corresponding results below. Clicking on the text of any of the results will take you directly to the first page of that chapter or section. The search text will be highlighted in yellow on the page.

Book Text

If the search text is found anywhere in the book text, the search result is shown in the Book Text section. Click on Book Text to show all of the corresponding results below. Click on the text of any of the results to go directly to the page with the search result. The search text will be highlighted in yellow on the page.

Shared Notes and My Notes

If the search text is found in the within a note (shared or personal) it will show up in the corresponding section of the search results. Click on the text of any of the results to go directly to the page containing that note. If there is a link contained in the note (internal or external), clicking on the link in the search results box will take you to the target of that link, rather than the page containing that note.

My Highlights

If the search text is found in book text that you have highlighted, it will show up in the My Highlights section of the search results. Click on the page number of the search result to go directly to the page containing the corresponding highlight. The search term will be highlighted in yellow within your existing highlight.

Example search results listed with page number

Sample page with right-click options, the last of which is Add NoteThere are two ways to create notes in your Sapling Learning eTextbook. You can create a standalone note or you can anchor a note to an existing highlight.

To create a standalone note, right-click anywhere within the textbook page and click on the Add note option. This will bring up the Note Editor and an area where you can type your note. As you begin typing in the text area, the formatting menu will appear so that you can bold, italicize, strikethrough, superscript, subscript or make a list within your note.

To add a link to another page of the book in your book within your note, highlight the text that you would like to be clickable, and click on the Page link icon. In the subsequent popup box, enter the page number that you would like to jump to and click OK. The highlighted text will now appear blue and underlined signifying that there is a link associated with this text.

To add a link to an external resource, highlight the text that you would like to be clickable, and click on the External link icon. In the subsequent popup box, enter the url of the webpage you would like to link to and click OK. The highlighted text will now appear blue and underlined signifying that there is a link associated with this text.

When you are done editing the note, click on the Save note icon. This will save your note and collapse it into the note icon stored on the side of the page.

To create a note that is anchored to a particular highlight, right click on the highlighted text and click on the Add note icon.

To open a note, click on the note icon. This will open the text of the note.

To move a note, with the note open, click and drag on the body of the note.

To close a note, click anywhere else on the body of the page.

To edit an existing note, right click on the note icon (if the note is closed) or on the body of the note (if the note is open) and click on the Edit icon in the center of the menu.

To delete a note, right click on the note icon (if the note is closed) or on the body of the note (if the note is open) and click on the Delete icon on the right side of the menu.

Add/Remove Bookmark icon adjacent to the Next Page button in the top-right corner fo the reading pane.Each time you access the eTextbook, it opens to the page that you most recently viewed. However, if you would like quick access to another page of the eTextbook, you can bookmark that page.

To make a bookmark, you can either click on the bookmark icon  near the top-right corner of the reading pane, or you can right-click anywhere in the reading pane, and then click on the Add bookmark icon in the middle of the menu.
Right-click options, where the middle button is Add bookmark

Your bookmarks are saved in the Bookmarks section of the left pane. Each bookmark is listed with the page number as well as the date the bookmark was made.
Notes, Bookmarks, and Highlights pane, with Bookmarks tab selected. Example bookmark with page number.

Note editor with "Share this note" checkbox selected.As an instructor, you can share a note with your students. Notes that you have created or that have been shared with you show up under the Notes section in the left panel.

To share a note, first create a note as you normally would, but click on the checkbox labeled Share this note with your students. Then save the note using the save icon. The icon for this note will have red horizontal lines to indicate that it is a shared note, and the count of your Shared Notes will increment by one. This note will now also show up in each of your students’ Shared Notes sections for each course you are teaching that is using this text.

You can highlight text in your eTextbook just as you would in a physical textbook. Your highlights are saved in your copy of the book and are available to you when you log in to Sapling Learning from any device.

To make a highlight, simply click and drag over the text that you would like to highlight. Release the mouse button at the end of the text you would like highlighted. The Highlights section in the left panel should now reflect a new highlight.

To change the color of your highlight, right-click on the highlighted portion of the text and choose the new highlight color from the four choices in the menu.

To add a note to your highlight, right-click on the highlighted portion of the text and choose the Add note icon on the right side of the menu. To learn more about creating notes, refer to the Notes page.

To delete a highlight, right-click on the highlighted portion of the text and click on the Remove highlight option. Your Highlights section in the left panel should now reflect one less highlight.

The area on the left side of the eTextbook is where your notes, bookmarks, highlights are stored. To collapse the pane, click on the orange triangle at the far left. Click the orange triangle again to expand the pane.

The Notes section may contain two different types of notes. My Notes are notes that you have created. Shared notes are notes that have been shared with you by either the publisher or your instructor. Shared notes may contain links to external content or to another page in the book. Clicking on a link from a shared note will take you directly to the link location (external links will be opened in a new tab) while clicking on any of the other text from the shared note will take you to the page of the eTextbook containing the note and open the note.

The Bookmarks section lists all of the bookmarks that you have made in your eTextbook. Each bookmark is listed with the page number and the date it was created. To go to a bookmarked page, click on that row in your bookmarks list.

The Highlights section lists all of the highlights you have made. Each highlight is listed by page number and shows a selection of the characters of your highlighted text. If there is a note associated with the highlight, a colored square, corresponding to the color of the highlight, appears next to the page number of the highlight.  To navigate to the page with the highlight, click on the page number of the highlight.

When taking an assignment, you can quickly get to the relevant section of the eTextbook (if available) by expanding the eTextbook area within the Resources sidebar. This is especially useful for students when they are struggling with a particular homework question, and would like to review the reference material.

Assignment with Resources panel, Assignment Information, and eTextbook.Resources panel with eTextbook section expanded to reveal section link.

1. To edit something on your course home page, first click Turn editing on Turn editing on button in the upper right corner.

2. Now, you’ll notice a row of icons after each activity or resource. Set of icons: move right, move, update, delete, show, no groups, copy assignment

move right icon Indent: Click to indent. Successive clicks on the right-pointing arrow will indent further. Successive clicks on the left-pointing arrow , if present, will undo the indents.
move icon Move: After clicking the move button, you will be prompted to click on a white rectangle that represents the desired position of the link. 
update icon Edit: Allows you to change settings of a resource or activity.
delete icon Delete: Deletes the activity or resource forever. There is a confirmation, but no undo.
hide iconshow icon Hide/Show: When hidden, this button will look like a closed eye lid. When shown, this button will look like an open eye . Hidden links appear grayed-out to instructors and are completely invisible to students.
No groups (click to change) iconSeparate groups (click to change) icon Group mode: This setting is only applicable to forums in courses that have groups. If you are not using forums with groups, you can ignore this button.
copy assignment icon Copy: Click this button to copy the assignment. The new copy will appear just below the original. The copy will be hidden from students and it won't have any dates set, but all other settings (points, policy, etc.) will match the original.

 

3. You’ll also see buttons at the far right side of each week/topic block.

show only this topic icon

Collapse/Expand: Click this button to collapse the page to show only that week/topic. Click again to expand back to the full page viewshow all topics icon. Note that each user can choose to collapse or expand their page. In other words, your setting does not affect anyone else’s personal setting. Tip: if a student claims they cannot see an assignment, it could be because they accidentally collapsed their page.
highlight this topic icon Highlight: This option is only available if your course is in Topics format. Click to highlight a topic block. Click again to un-highlight. In Weekly format, the current week will automatically highlight. The format can be changed by going to Settings.
hide topic iconshow topic icon Hide/Show: Click to hide the entire block and everything in it. Click again to unhide.
  Move: Drag-and-drop the block into a new position in the relative order. You may also want to change the grade column order if you do this.
move up iconmove down icon Move up/down: Click to move the block by one position in the relative order. You may also want to change the grade column order if you do this.
Delete section: Click to delete the entire block and its contents.

 

4. To get a sense of how your course page looks to students, click Switch role to student in the upper right corner.

Additional Sections

To add more sections:

  1. go to Settings
  2. increase the number of weeks/topics
  3. then click Save changes.

 

Single File and/or Link

1. On your main course page, click Turn editing on. 

2. Scroll to the block in which you want the link to appear.
3. From the Add a Resource... menu, select Link to a file or web site...
4. Give the resource a name (this will become the link text).
5. From here, you can choose to link to an external website or one of your own files.

a. External website

i. Enter the URL in the "Location" field.

ii. Then click Save and return to course.

b. File

i. Click Choose or upload a file...

ii. If you see the desired file in the list, skip to step v. Otherwise, click Upload a file at the bottom right.

iii. Click the Choose File or Browse button ( or ) and locate the file on your computer.

iv. Click Upload this file.

v. Click Choose for the desired file.

vi. Scroll down and click Save and return to course

 


The link may now be moved as needed. Note that any file you post will remain private to just the members of your course.

Managing Files and Folders

  1. Click Course Management > Files.
  2. Click Upload a file to add to your list of available files. Files added in this manner won't be linked on the course page until you add the link using the method described above.
  3. Additionally, you can create folders to which you can move existing files, or upload new files. Make a folder
      Menu options: With chosen files...Move to another folder
     

 

 

Display a Directory

This option allows you to put a link on your course page to one of your file folders within the course.

  1. On your main course page, click Turn editing on.
  2. Scroll to the block in which you want the directory (aka folder) to appear.
  3. From the Add a resource... menu, click Display a directory.
  4. Give the link a name.
  5. Choose which directory to display.
  6. Click Save and return to course.

Upload Multiple Files at Once

  1. First, make a .zip file that contains all the files that you want to upload. Highlight the files on your computer, right-click, and select the option about compressing. On a PC, the option will say Send To > Compressed (zipped) folder. On a Mac, the option will say Compress # items.
  2. On your course page in Sapling Learning, click Course Management > Files.
  3. If you'd like the new files to be grouped in a folder, Make a folder and click on it, or click on existing folder. Otherwise, continue to the next step.
  4. Click Upload a file, locate the .zip file, then click Upload this file.
  5. Click Unzip, then OK.
  6. Once unzipped, you can delete the .zip file (optional).
     

Whenever a student enters your course or clicks on a link within your course, a log entry is created. So you can find out which students accessed which activities at what times.

Viewing the access logs

1. From your main course page, click or hover your mouse over Course Management.
2. In the menu that appears to the right of your cursor, click Reports.
Course management menu with Reports option selected
3. Select the desired group, participant, date, and/or activity to focus on using the dropdown menus.  Leave the actions as All actions because the other choices don’t necessarily apply to every type of activity.  If you want to download rather than display the results, change Display on page to Download in your desired file format.
Example menu selections: All participants, All days, Homework 8, All actions, Display on page
4. Click Get these logs.

Participation report

The participation report tells you which students have viewed a particular activity and allows you to email the students who have not yet viewed it.

1. From your main course page, click or hover your mouse over Course Management.
2. In the menu that appears to the right of your cursor, click Reports.
3. Click the Participation report link.
4. Choose an activity and look-back period, and set Show only to Student. For most activities, you’ll want to set Show actions to View (the Post option only applies to forums and essays).Example options: Activity module Homework 2, Look back 3 weeks, Show only Student, Show actions View
5. Click Go.
6. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Select all ‘no’. It that button doesn't appear, first click Show all x  to get all students onto a single page.

7. Choose With selected users > Add/send message.
8. Type the desired message to the students and then click Preview.
9. If the preview looks acceptable, click Send message. Otherwise click Update and return to step 8.
Example message preview: Reminder, your homework will be due soon!

Forums provide a location to post messages to your students. Depending on the type of forum, your students may be able to post as well.

Forum types

  • News forum: Instructors can post new topics and post replies to existing topics. Students can read but not post in the news forum. There can only be one news forum per course.
  • A single simple discussion: A single topic, all on one page. Useful for short, focused discussions.
  • Standard forum for general use: An open forum where anyone can start a new topic at any time. This is the best general-purpose forum.
  • Each person posts one discussion: Each person can post exactly one new discussion topic (everyone can reply to them though). This is useful when you want each student to start a discussion about, say, their reflections on the week's topic, and everyone else responds to these.
  • Q And A Forum: The Q & A forum requires students to post their perspectives before viewing other students' postings. After the initial posting, students can view and respond to others' postings. This feature allows equal initial posting opportunity among all students, thus encouraging original and independent thinking.

Adding a Forum

With the exception of the News forum, a forum can be added as follows.

  1. Click Turn editing on in the upper right corner of the main course page.
  2. Scroll to the desired section of the course and select Add an activity...Forum.
  3. Give the forum a name.
  4. Select a forum type (see above).
  5. Explain the purpose of the forum in the Forum introduction.
  6. The remaining settings are optional.  If you want to learn more about a setting, click the help with this topic icon next to that setting. Otherwise, you can ignore the remaining settings.
  7. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Save and return to course.

To add or remove the News forum, you must add or delete the Latest news block in the right side-bar of the main course page.

Subscription

If a user is "subscribed" to a forum, they will receive an email notification for each new post. Each forum has an instructor option to Force everyone to be subscribed. If you don't force, each student can choose for themselves whether to subscribe to that forum or not.

When making a post, you'll see an option to Mail now. When unchecked, the system will wait 30 minutes before emailing subscribers in case you catch a mistake you need to edit. When checked, the system will email subscribers immediately. Either way, an email of the post will be sent to all students who are subscribed to that forum.

Groups

If you are using groups in your course, you'll be able to post different messages to different groups and/or restrict students to working within their own group.

  1. First, make sure that the Group mode of the forum is set to Separate groups. You can set this option when you first create the forum, or you may edit it later. To edit an existing forum, click on it, then click Update this forum. Alternatively, click the no groups icon or separate groups iconicon next to the forum on the main course page to toggle through the options.
  2. Once configured, continue to or open the forum.
  3. To post to only one group, select the desired group from the Separate groups dropdown before adding a new topic or question. This will also restrict student replies and posts, if applicable, to their own group. To restrict the students' interaction to just their group but still allow them to see all posts for the other groups, choose Visible groups instead.
  4. Make sure that each student in your course is assigned to a group.

IMPORTANT: If you are not using groups in your course, be sure to set the Group mode to No groups.

Troubleshooting

Why can't my students make posts or replies?

  • First, make sure you are using a Forum type that allows student interaction. The News forum, for example, is limited to instructor interaction only. Some forum types allow students to reply to existing topics but they can't start new ones. Other forum types allow students to post new topics as well as reply.
  • If you are not using groups in your course, be sure to set the Group mode to No groups. You can set this option when you first create the forum, or you may edit it later. To edit an existing forum, click on it, then click Update this forum. Alternatively, click the no groups icon or separate groups iconicon next to the forum on the main course page to toggle through the options.
  • If you are using groups in your course, you may still want to set the Group mode to No groups as described above. Group options are only necessary if you want to restrict students from seeing or posting to certain topics based on their group, but otherwise just complicate the matter. For example, if the Group mode is set to Visible groups or Separate groups and you make a post to the whole forum rather than to a specific group, students will not be able to reply to it.

 

You can import activities, resources, labels, and files from any course in which you are an instructor, to any other course in which you are an instructor.

  1. Go to the course that you want to add to.
  2. Click Course Management > Import.
  3. Where it says "Courses I have taught", choose the course that you want to copy from and click Use this course.
  4. Select the components to import. It can be useful to deselect everything first by clicking None at the top.
  5. If the course you're importing from contains any files (for example, if you uploaded your syllabus) you can choose "Course files: Yes" to bring those files over with the import. The other two options regarding "Site files" and "Dates" do not do anything.
  6. Click the Continue button at the bottom of the page.
  7. Repeat step 6 three more times.

The components will be appended to the same numbered block where they appeared in the original course (as long as that block exists in the course to which they were imported). If that block does not exist (e.g., if the new course has fewer blocks than the original course) the components will be appended to the top block.

Your TechTA has most likely made chapter assignments for you as a starting point. Here's how to view them, so that you can decide what changes, if any, need to be made.

  1. Click on the name of an activity.
  2. Skim the question titles to get a general sense of the activity. You may need to scroll down to see all the questions.
  3. To see an expanded view of a particular question, double-click on its title. Double-click again to collapse it.
  4. To preview the whole assignment as a student would see it, click the Student activity preview icon button.
  5. Use the numbers on the left side of the preview to navigate to different questions, or use the Next and Previous buttons.
  6. Click Return to the Activity Editor when finished.

Note that your attempts made in the assignment preview will be saved, even if you close the browser and return later. To refresh the assignment preview (clear out your work and update the question list), double-click on any question title as described in step 3.

Flash-based Assignments 

Flash-based assignments support custom grading policies, as well as the five built-in policies. For more information, see Grading Policies.

Mobile Assignments 

Mobile assignments support the following built-in policies, but do not support custom policies at this time.

Practice

  • You can check your answers. 
  • You can view solutions when you complete or give up on any question. 
  • You can keep trying to answer each question until you get it right or give up. 
  • There is no penalty for number of attempts.

Homework

  • You can check your answers.
  • You can view solutions when you complete or give up on any question.
  • You can keep trying to answer each question until you get it right or give up. 
  • You lose 5% of the points available to each answer in your question for each incorrect attempt at that answer.

Test

  • You can see if your answers are correct once the solutions are available.
  • You can view solutions after you complete the assignment.

Random-order Test

Same as "Test" but the order of the questions within the assignment changes from student to student.

x (with periodic table)

Each policy above is also available in a version that supplies a link to a digital and printable periodic table within the assignment.

 

Settings panel with Edit Settings button highlightedThis help document covers the Grading Policies that govern how your assignments appear and how scores are computed. For other assignment settings, see Editing Activities.

Several policy settings are available for each activity in your course. You can create custom policies to use in your course, or use one of the four built-in policy sets. You can see which policy set is active and change policy sets through the Settings panel in the Activity Editor (reached by clicking the name of an assignment). If you do not see the Settings panel, you may need to first close the library by clicking the book icon. To edit the policy for several assignments at once, use the Activities and Due Dates page.

Warning: Do not change assignment grading policies after students have already started taking the assignment. Existing work will not be regraded, while new work will be graded using the new policy. In fact, the policy menu will be disabled once students have started to prevent you from accidentally making this type of change.

Built-In Policy Sets

Five built-in policy sets are available.

  • Homework: The default policy for new activities is called Homework, and unsurprisingly, is what we recommend for standard homework assignments. This policy set gives students feedback for their incorrect answers, and allows them to see the solution when they've finished the question. This policy set also includes a built-in calculator and periodic table, and allows students to print assignments. Students are allowed unlimited attempts at Homework assignments, and lose 5% of the available points on each question for each incorrect attempt.
  • Homework (no periodic table): Same as above but removes the periodic table link from assignments. This is typically used for economics or non-science courses.
  • Practice: A few of your assignments may be set to Practice mode. Practice mode is identical to Homework mode, except there is no penalty for incorrect attempts. We recommend this policy for assignments that teach students how to use the system since some of those questions may instruct them to get things wrong.
  • Test: In Test mode, students do not receive any feedback while they take an assignment and they do not have a Check Answer button. They can move back and forth through the assignment, changing their answers as often as they like, but they do not receive any feedback or information about which questions are right or wrong until the due date passes. Students only receive credit in Test mode for their final answers, but all responses are saved.
  • Practice Test: Practice Tests are like tests, but students can submit the assignment when they finish to receive feedback immediately about their score.

Settings panel opened to reveal Policies menu options

Custom Policies

You can also define a custom policy set, by choosing Custom in the Policies menu, or simply by changing the displayed settings and clicking Save (you will then be prompted to give your new policy a name). Once you have created a custom policy, you can apply it to any future assignments simply by selecting it from the Policies menu. We recommend that you check with your TechTA before using this option to make sure you understand how these policies will work. Once your students have started to view an assignment, you will no longer be able to edit the policy.

Example custom policy with Show feedback, show periodic table, show calculator, print, guided solution, unlimited attempts, 5% deduction, and show solution after due dateIf you decide to set a custom policy, you can choose from several settings:

  • Name: Give the policy set a name, so you can find it and use it again for another assignment.
  • Show Feedback: If this option is checked, students have a Check Answer button. When unchecked,  you must set the number of attempts to "unlimited" and the percent deduction to "none" because these settings are no longer applicable in the absence of a Check Answer button.
  • Show Periodic Table: Make an interactive periodic table available through a link at the top of the assignment.
  • Show Calculator: Make a scientific calculator available through a link at the top of the assignment.
  • Print: Allow students to print the assignment to work on it offline.
  • Show Resources (if enabled for this course): Resources are helpful information, such as relevant video lectures or textbook sections.
  • Attempt Deduction for Multiple Choice: This settings only affects how multiple choice questions are graded. Choosing this option overrides the normal attempt deduction and grades more harshly depending on the number of choices. For example, with 4 choices, it will deduct 33% of the available points per attempt. In most cases, we do not recommend this setting because it does not behave properly for multiple-select questions.
  • Randomize Question Order: If this setting is on, each student will receive the assignment questions in a random order.
  • Guided Solution: Some questions have special Guided Solution tutorials, which walk students through the question. If this setting is on (recommended for multi-attempt assignments), students will receive a new version of the "main" question after completing a Guided Solution, allowing them to possibly receive full points if they can then answer the question without help.
  • Timed: Limit the time a student can spend working on an assignment, but still allow them to start the assignment any time within a larger time frame. For more info, see Timed Assignments.
  • Number of Attempts: Set how many times your students can attempt to answer each question (unlimited by default in Homework and Practice modes, 1 in Test modes). Percent deductions, feedback, and guided solutions are not compatible with single-attempt assignments. We recommend allowing at least 4 attempts.
  • Percent Deduction per Attempt: Set what percentage of their total score for that question a student will lose for each attempt (5% by default in Homework mode). Set this to "None" for practice assignments
  • Show Solution: This policy determines when students can see the solutions to questions:
    • Upon Completion of each Question: Reveal solutions when the student gets the correct answer or gives up on each question. This setting adds a Give Up & View Solution button to allow students to indicate that they wish to forfeit further attempts and see the answer to the question.
    • Upon Assignment Completion: Reveal solutions when the student completes the assignment or the due date passes, whichever comes first. Prior to the due date, a student can "complete" the assignment in one of two ways: (1) they can get all questions correct or (2) they can click the Submit button to give up on on any remaining questions. Note that once submitted, the student cannot continue to answer, even if they have an extension on the due date. If you choose to use this setting, we advise you to warn your students against clicking Submit unless they are certain they want to forfeit the ability to increase their score.
    • After Due Date: Reveal solutions to a given student when the due date passes for that student.
    • After Extended Due Date: This option takes into account that some students may have later due dates than others because of extensions, or that late submissions may be allowed. Even if the due date has passed for a particular student, they cannot view solutions until the extended due date or late submission deadline has passed for all students.

If you need to give one or more students more time to finish an assignment, you can grant them a due-date extension. Similarly, you can open an assignment early for some students by setting an available-from offset.

To give the whole class more time, just change the main due date.
 

Set a Due-Date Extension or Available-From Offset

  1. Click Activities and Due Dates at the top-left of your course.
  2. The last two columns indicate whether any offsets or extensions are currently present using a 0 or a person icon . Click the 0 or the  icon to go to the offsets/extensions page.
  3. Make sure the assignment has an available from date and/or due date set.
  4. Click Add individual offsets or extensions to add a new offset or extension.
  5. Select one or more students from the list on the left.
  6. Choose the new available from date and/or due date from the menus at the top of the block.
  7. Click Save.

The new available from date or due date will now apply to the student(s) you chose.

Edit an Existing Offset or Extension

  1. Click available from date or due date you wish to edit.
  2. Use the menus to set a new date and time.
  3. Click the blue save icon .

Update Several Offsets or Extensions at Once

  1. Click the checkbox next to the students you wish to update.
  2. In the new row that appears ("Update Selected Users"), set the new available from date and/or due date.
  3. Click the blue save icon .

Delete an Offset or Extension

  1. Click the X next to the offset or extension.
  2. In the popup box, click OK.

Group Offsets and Extensions

If you use groups in your course, it is possible to grant offsets and/or extensions to a whole group of students. Please see group offsets and extensions.

Video

This optional video summarizes the steps listed above.

There are two types of group offsets and extensions.

  • Course-wide: Set it once and you’re done.  This works best when the difference between due times for the groups is always the same (e.g., the Tuesday section’s work is always due 1 day later than the Monday section’s work).
  • Per-assignment: This is more flexible, but takes a little longer to set up.

Setting course-wide group offsets and extensions

1. From your main course page, click or hover your mouse over Course Management.
2. In the menu that appears to the right of your cursor, click Groups.
3. Click on a group name to select it. If no groups exist, see Creating a group.
4. Scroll to the bottom and click Edit group settings.
5. Choose how much later this group’s dates should be (relative to the earliest group) by specifying the difference in weeks, days, hours and minutes.
6. Scroll to the bottom and click Save changes.

The offsets/extensions will automatically take effect for any activities that have a standard due date set, with the exception of hand-graded activities.

Setting per-assignment group offsets and extensions

Extensions/offsets for groups can be set on a per-assignment basis in the same place as you’d set extensions/offsets for individuals. Just click Add group offsets or extensions (at the bottom of the page) instead of Add individual offsets or extensions. If you don't see this option then you first need to create a group. Note that the assignment must have a standard due date set before extensions/offsets may be applied.

  1. Click Activities and Due Dates at the top-left of your course.
  2. The last two columns indicate whether any offsets or extensions are currently present using a 0 or a person icon . Click the 0 or the  icon to go to the offsets/extensions page.
  3. Make sure the assignment has an available from date and/or due date set.
  4. Click Add group offsets or extensions to add a new offset or extension.
  5. Select one or more groups from the list on the left.
  6. Choose the new available from date and/or due date from the menus at the top of the block.
  7. Click Save.

 

 

 

With timed assignments, you can limit the time a student can spend working on an assignment, but still allow them to start the assignment any time within a larger time frame. For example, you could allow the student to take a quiz whenever they want, but once they start they only have 30 minutes. You can optionally set a due date and/or an available-from date to constrain when the student can start the assignment.

How to make a timed assignment

  1. Click on the assignment to open the activity editor. If the assignment doesn't exist, you'll first need to create it.
  2. In the settings panel, click the Edit Settings button . If you don't see this option, you may need to click the book icon to collapse the library.
  3. In the Policies menu, select Custom....
  4. Give the policy a name, such as "30-min quiz".
  5. Scroll down and check the box for the Timed option.
  6. Select the desired number of hours and minutes.
  7. Verify all the other grading options and make changes as necessary. For more information see grading policies.
  8. Click the Save button .

Important notes

  • The timed assignment option is found within the grading policy. Grading policies cannot be changed once students have started working on an assignment.
  • The student will be warned that the assignment is timed when they first click on it. Their time does not start until they agree to the warning.
    Example warning to student: You are about to open a timed assignment. You have 30 minutes to complete this assignment once opened. Do you wish to proceed? Yes, begin Timed Assignment or Cancel.
  • Once a student's time starts, it cannot be paused.
  • A countdown timer displays to the student in the upper-right corner of the assignment.
    Example countdown: Time remaining 27 minutes 45 sections
  • The timer continues to count down even when the student closes the assignment.
  • You can optionally include a due date and/or an available-from date if you'd like to constrain the time frame in which a student may start the timed assignment. The student will be prevented from answering when the due date passes or when their time runs out, whichever comes first.
  • Individuals or groups can be granted extensions on the due date (if present), but not on the allotted time. To accommodate students who need extra time, you'll need to create a separate assignment for them. For more information, see accommodating extra time.
  • Keep in mind that some students may have faster internet connections than others, and that the load time for each question will count against the student's total time. Please allot plenty of time to account for these differences.
  • Keep in mind that students may have technical difficulties. Thus, we recommend using timed assignments sparingly, and only after students have had sufficient practice using the system.
  • If necessary, you can reset the assignment for a student, which clears all their work, re-randomizes values (if applicable), and resets the timer so that the student can start over completely.
  • Late penalty cannot be enabled in the same assignment as the timed feature.

Timed Assignments

The only way to give different students different amounts of time on timed assignments is to create two assignments and set a different time limit for each one.

  1. Create a copy of the timed assignment.
  2. In the new assignment, create a new grading policy with a longer duration in the Timed section.
  3. Set the Available date and Due date as needed for both assignments.
  4. For students who need extra time, offset their Available date on the original assignment to prevent them from completing it. We recommend choosing a date that is after the end of the term.
  5. For students who do not need extra time, offset their Available date on the duplicate assignment to prevent them from completing it. We recommend choosing a date that is after the end of the term.

Open the eye to make both assignments visible. The original assignment will be available to all students except the ones needing extra time. The duplicate assignment will be available only to the students needing extra time.

Note: All students will be able to see both assignments, but they can only complete one of them.

Regular Assignments

For regular (non-timed) assignments, it's easy to accommodate students with special needs using recurring extensions.

Flash-based assignments  support the option to allow late submissions as described in Late Penalty. Similar features for mobile assignments  are coming soon. 

Example settings: Due 7/31, deduct 10% of the remaining possible points per day late until 8/10.For assignments that have a due date, you can enable late submissions and configure a deduction per day late.

How to allow late submissions with a penalty

  1. Click on the assignment to open the activity editor. If the assignment doesn't exist, you'll first need to create it.
  2. In the settings panel, click the Edit Settings button . If you don't see this option, you may need to click the book icon to collapse the library.
  3. Set or verify the Due Date of the assignment.
  4. Once a due date is set, you'll be able to click the checkbox for Allow late Submissions.
  5. Choose the desired percentage to deduct from any additional points earned from late answers.
  6. Choose the desired end date for late submissions. The system will auto-fill the date after which students can no longer earn points for their answers, but you are free to change it. If you choose a date that is later than the suggestion, students can continue answering for no points. A student's score cannot decrease over time or with continued attempts.

Important notes

  • If late submissions are allowed and the main due date has passed, you cannot change the due date or the deduction.
  • Granting an extension is permitted, but will NOT re-grade attempts that a student already made with the penalty.
  • If you need to change the due date and are willing to accept the consequences of the fact that it won't re-grade, you can give the whole class an extension.
  • If you often change due dates and/or grant extensions in your class, we do not recommend using this option. Instead, we recommend using this option as a substitute for granting individual extensions.
  • If a student has made attempts after the due date, the Attempts column of their assignment will show two values. For example, 3/2 in the Attempts column means that the student made three total attempts on that question, two of which were after the due date.
  • The resources panel on the right side of the assignment will indicate to the student whether late submissions are allowed, and what the penalty is per day late.
    Example resources panel with message "Late submissions allowed with 10% of the points possible deducted per day until 5/25 at 2 PM
  • After the due date has passed, the student will also be notified on the main course page if late submissions are allowed.
    Example mouseover on course page: 8% of the points possible are deducted per da if the due date is passed until 6/03
  • A timed assignment will not have the option to turn on late penalty, and vice versa.

Removing Questions

  1. Click the question (to select it). To remove multiple questions, hold down the control key and click the other questions.
  2. Click the trash icon.

Adding Questions

  1. Click the book icon to open the library .
  2. Choose a topic on the far left. The available questions will appear in the middle of the page.
  3. Click the question (to select it). To select multiple questions, hold down the control key and click the other questions.
  4. Click the Add Selected Items button , or drag the question into the list, or click the checkbox in the Use column .

Also see Finding Questions.

Rearranging Questions

To rearrange questions in the Assignment list, simply drag them up or down (or use the up/down arrow buttons after selecting a question or questions).

Under Question Banks (aka the library), you can click the column headers to arrange the list by that property. For example, you can sort the list of available questions by difficulty. Click the same header again to reverse the sorting.

Undo/Redo

To undo a change to the question list, click the undo button  at the top of the Assignment. To reapply a change you undid, click the redo button .

Click on an assignment title to open the activity editor. Once you have the activity editor open, there are several ways to find questions to add to the assignment.

Browse by topic

  1. Click on the book icon  to open the library. 
  2. Notice on the far left that the subject of your course is already selected, and all available questions for that subject are displayed in the middle of the page.
  3. Click the + button to drill down to narrower topics. There are four hierarchical levels that we like to call taxonomy, chapter, section, and topic. 
  4. Click to highlight a taxonomy, chapter, section, or topic to display its contents (i.e., a list of questions). The number of questions available in each taxonomy, chapter, section, or topic is shown after its title.

Highlight multiple

  • Shift+click will allow you to select multiple adjacent topics, chapters, etc.
  • Ctrl+click (PC) or Cmd+click (Mac) will allow you to select or de-select multiple non-adjacent topics, chapters, etc.

Locate a topic

If there are already questions in the Assignment (the area on the far right) you may wish to browse other questions in those same topics. Here's how to quickly locate those topics within the question banks.

  1. Click on a question in the Assignment to highlight it.
  2. Click the locate button. Locate Item in Question Banks
  3. You will be taken directly to that question's topic in the Question Banks panel.

Sort

In the Question Banks panel, clicking on any of the column headers will allow you to sort the displayed questions by that attribute. For example, click Difficulty to arrange the current question list from lowest to highest difficulty. Click Difficulty again to reverse the sort order. But keep in mind that a question's difficulty must be qualified by the subject it was written for, as indicated by the Source column. Note that some columns may require you to scroll to the right to see them. You can also drag and drop columns to reorder them.

For additional columns, or to change the order of the columns, click Choose Columns to Display.

Search

Although the button is labeled as search, it is actually a filter of whatever you have already selected.

  1. Click on the book icon  to open the library. You may want to drag the center divider  to the right to make more room.
  2. Select at least one area of the Question banks panel to search within. To maximize your results, choose a whole taxonomy (the top-most hierarchical level) or Shift+click to select multiple taxonomies.
  3. Click the Search button.
  4. Choose Title, Description, or ID.
  5. If filtering by title or description, type a keyword into the box. If filtering by ID, type the ID number of the desired question into the box.

Don't forget that you can Shift+click to select multiple subjects! This will maximize your search results and is a good option to try if you are aren't finding what you're looking for. 

Search for multiple-choice questions

Single-part multiple-choice questions with five or fewer options have the phrase "i>clicker friendly" in their description. Although searching by this keyword won't find all multiple-choice questions in our system, it will find most of them.

  1. Follow steps 1-3 in the "Search" instructions above.
  2. Choose Description.
  3. Type the word clicker into the box. 

Advanced search

For more advanced filter options, click Add New Criteria .

  • Each criterion can be individually set to look at Title, Description, or ID.
  • Each criterion can be individually set set to Contain or Does not contain the search term.
  • And, you can choose whether to match All or Any of the criteria.

Find your custom questions

  1. Click on the book icon  to open the library. 
  2. Select the subject of your course, or Shift+click to select multiple subjects.
  3. Click the column header labeled Source. If you don't see a Source column, you may need to scroll to the right, or change your display options with the Choose Columns to Displaybutton.
  4. Click the Source column header again to sort in reverse alphabetical order, putting all questions with a source of "You" at the top.

Important notes

  • Questions that you wrote from scratch get placed in a topic called Your Questions (uncategorized) which is found in section 1.1 of each taxonomy. So to find that topic, click the + to open the first chapter and first section of any subject.
  • Questions that you created as copies of an existing question get placed in the same topic as the original.
  • Exception: when editing a question, you can choose its location via the Information tab. If you have done this, it may negate the first two bullets above.
  • All of your questions (whether written from scratch or copied) get labeled with "You" as the Source. So the best way to see all of your custom questions at once is to highlight an entire taxonomy and sort by Source.

Grades can be imported into and exported out of Sapling Learning. We recommend that you export grades at least once before attempting an import, to set up the file you will use for importing.

Exporting Grades

  1. Click the Export tab at the top of the gradebook.
  2. Select one of the export filetypes at the top (OpenDocument spreadsheet, Plain text file, Excel spreadsheet, or XML file). You most likely want either a Plain text file (.txt which can be changed to .csv) or an Excel spreadsheet.
  3. You will be given the option to choose what fields to export. For basic usage, leave all fields selected, and click Submit. You will be prompted to save the file.

You can import the plain text file (.txt) into any program that accepts csv files, such as Excel. Tip: Change the filename to end in .csv in Windows so that Excel will recognize the file as a comma-separated list.

Importing Grades

  1. To import grades, begin with an exported copy of your gradebook, or the participants page, or any spreadsheet that contains a unique identifier for your students (Sapling email, Sapling userID, or studentID if that info is filled in for each student in Sapling).
  2. Add a column to your spreadsheet for each activity you'd like to import grades for, and enter the score for each student in the same row as their identifier.
  3. Save the file as a comma-separated list (csv).
  4. Choose the Import tab at the top of the gradebook.
  5. Click Choose File and select your csv file. Leave everything else as-is and click Upload Grades.
  6. In the Identify user by block, choose which column from your file should match up with the unique identifier in Sapling (useremail, userid, or useridnumber*)..
  7. Scroll down to the Grade item mappings block, which shows you a list of all the column headers from your file. For any new gradebook column you wish to add, choose new gradeitem**. For any existing gradebook column that you wish to overwrite, choose the name of that gradebook column in Sapling. For everything else, leave as ignore.
  8. Scroll to the bottom and click Upload grades.

Important notes

*In the map to dropdown, userid refers to the student's Sapling id (an arbitrary number generated by Sapling), whereas useridnumber is an optional field in Sapling that may be used to store your school's student ID for that student. If you have not already asked your TechTA or your students to include their student IDs, then you cannot use useridnumber as the identifier for grade import.

**If you choose new gradeitem for a particular set of scores from your file, those scores cannot be greater than 100. If you wish for an item to have a max score above 100, you'll need to add the grade item first (see below), set the max points to be >100, then map the scores to that existing grade item during import.

Add new grade item

Here's how to make a new blank column in your gradebook without importing from a file.

  1. Click Grades on the left side of your course.
  2. Click Categories and items at the top of the gradebook.
  3. Click Add grade item at the bottom of that page.
  4. Enter the item name (which will appear as the column header) and the maximum grade (the number of points each score is out of).
  5. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Save changes.

For more information and a video about grade items, see grades for external activities.

You can make additional columns in the Sapling Learning gradebook for activities completed outside of Sapling Learning. Scores can be entered manually, or imported from a comma-separated list (.csv file).

Add a column to the gradebook

  1. Click Grades on the left side of your course page to open the gradebook.
  2. Click Categories and items at the top of the page.
  3. Scroll to the very bottom of the page and click Add grade item.
  4. Enter the Item name and the Maximum grade (i.e., points possible). You can ignore the other settings.
  5. Click Save changes.
  6. Click the View tab to return to your gradebook.
  7. To enter scores manually, click Turn editing on at the top-right of your gradebook.
  8. Type the desired scores and click Update at the bottom of the page.

This optional video illustrates the steps above (there is no sound).

Related links

You may need to change the order of the gradebook columns, especially if you have recently added a new activity or rearranged the order of existing activities.

One-click reordering

The Reorder gradebook button can be found on both the main course page and within the gradebook. Clicking this button will do a one-time sort of the gradebook items to make them match the relative order on the course page. Category assignments will not change. If you make subsequent changes to the course page order, you'll need to click Reorder gradebook again.

  • From your main course page, click the Reorder gradebook button in the top right corner. 
    If you don't see this option, you'll first need to Turn editing on.
  • From the gradebook, click the Categories and Items tab, then click Reorder gradebook.

Manual reordering

As an alternative to the automatic ordering described above, you also have the option to manually re-order the gradebook columns.

1. From your main course page, click Grades in the left navigation panel.

2. Click the Categories and Items tab at the top.

3. Locate the activity that you’d like to move and click the Move button Move icon, which looks like a pair of arrows or harpoons.

4. You will be prompted to click on a white rectangle representing the new location of the activity. Move to here

Note that your gradebook may contain categories such as Ungraded or Extra Credit. You can move whole categories or move activities in or out of categories in the same way that you’d change the order of the items, described above. For more information on grade categories, see Advanced Gradebook Settings.

You can configure the Sapling Learning gradebook to automatically drop each student’s lowest score (or lowest 2, 3, etc. scores) from their overall average.

1. From your main course page, click Grades.
2. Click the Categories and Items tab at the top.
3. Click Full View.

4. In the pink bar, type a number into either the “Drop the lowest” or “Keep the highest” field. If you type a number for both fields, the system will use only your “Drop the lowest” entry and reset your “Keep the highest” entry to 0 (ignored) upon save.

5. Scroll to the button and click Save changes, or, if your cursor is still in the the field you just typed in, you can hit Enter on your keyboard to save.

Optional: Rename the Category total

The number of dropped/kept assignments is not displayed to students anywhere. If you’d like, you can edit the label for the overall average, which will show for both you and the students. 

1. Under Grades > Categories and Items, click the pencil icon in the pink bar.
The pencil icon has a mouseover tool tip of "Edit x" where x is the category name.

2. Type in the field for “Category total name” (you may need to click Show Advanced first). 
For example, you might want to call it “HW avg (lowest 2 dropped)”.


  

For hand-graded activities, we recommend the Online essay option because it is easier to use than either of the file upload options. Online essays allow students to type an essay directly into Sapling, to which you can assign a grade. Special characters (such as Greek letters) and formatting options (such as subscripts) are available for students to use in their submission.

Create an Online Essay

  1. Click Turn Editing On at the top-right corner of your course page.
  2. Click Add an activity... then choose Online essay.

    The file upload options are also available to you, but aren't recommended in most cases.
  3. Give the essay a Name. This is what will appear to students on your main course page.
  4. In the Description, indicate what you want the students to write about.
  5. Set the available from date and due date (if applicable).
  6. You can also set whether or not you want to prevent late submissions (if not, students will be able to submit their result late, and you can see when they submitted to adjust their score). We recommend setting the Prevent late submissions option to Yes.
  7. If you would like your students to keep trying (after you give them feedback), turn on Allow resubmitting.
  8. If you would like to be alerted when students submit answers, turn on Email alert to instructors.
  9. If you would like be able to comment directly within a student's essay, turn on Comments inline. Otherwise, you will be given a separate comment area for your feedback.
  10. Most likely, the only other settings you need is to make sure Visible is set to Show (to make sure your students can see the essay assignment when its "Available from" date arrives). You may also want to set the Grade category.
  11. Click Save and return to course to save your essay assignment.

Grade an Online Essay

  1. Click the name of the essay you wish to update from your main course page.
  2. Click the link that says No attempts have been made on this activity, or View X submitted activities (where X is the number of students who have submitted a response).

Once you are on the submissions page, there are several options for how to navigate and score the submissions.

  • To Allow quick grading, check the box at the bottom of the page, then click Save preferences.
  • If quick grading is enabled, you can set grades and leave comments without leaving this page. Be sure to click the Save all my feedback button when finished.
  • To see a student's submission, click the link in the Last modified (Student) column.
  • Alternatively, click the Grade or Update link in the Status column to see the student's submission, the grading options, and a comment box all together in one window. Be sure to Save changes or Save and show next when finished. 

Essay Comments

  • Comments are always optional, but their purpose is to give the student feedback on their essay and/or justify the grade you are giving them.
  • In-line comments (i.e., annotations from the grader within the student's essay) can be enabled for an online essay at any time. When creating a new essay, choose Comment inline = Yes. To find and edit this option for an existing essay, click the pencil icon on the main course page (you will need to make sure to click Turn editing on first). Note that in-line comments are only available for online essays, not for file upload.
  • If enabled, you can make an inline comment by clicking Grade or Update within the table of student submissions, then begin typing in the top-most box. Be sure to Save changes when finished.
  • Instructor comments will show up to the student on the Grades page next to their score for that activity. If after leaving comments, you'd like to see how it looks to a particular student, click Grades > User Report, then select the student's name from the drop-down menu at the top right. To get back to your normal view of the gradebook, click Grader report.
    Example student grades view with essay feedback
  • When comments are made in-line, the comment/feedback box will show the student's entire essay plus your comments. When comments are made directly in the comments box (i.e., not in-line) the comments/feedback box will contain only the instructor's comments without the student's full essay.

Related links

  1. Click Grades on the left side of your course page to open the grade book.
    grades icon
  2. Click the Categories and Items tab at the top of the page.
    The tab called Categories and Items, is between the View and Scales tabs.
  3. Find the activity or category that you want to hide from your students and click the hide icon, which looks like an open eye .  Once hidden, the icon will change to a closed eye. 

Warning: Hiding a category total will hide the entire category and its contents. If you want to hide just the category total, click the pencil icon for that category, then change the Grade type to None.

Flash-based assignments  support viewing and resetting work as described in Viewing and Resetting work. Mobile assignments  support resetting work as described in Resetting work - Mobile, but do not currently support viewing students' work. 

Viewing work

You can see what your students answered for any attempt of any question, as well as what feedback they received from the system on each attempt.

  1. From the Grades page, click on a score.
  2. You are now seeing the instructor view of a particular student’s assignment, which does not have the same functionality as the student view. The primary difference is that instructors always have the solution tab available but no check-answer button.
  3. Navigate to different questions using the left sidebar (if applicable), or by using the Next and Previous buttons at the bottom right, or the Map at the top.
  4. The tabs labeled Incorrect and Correct represent the attempts that the student has taken so far. Click on one of these tabs to view exactly what the student put and the feedback they received.  
    Example student work. There are three tabs labeled "Incorrect" and one tabled labeled "Correct" indicating that this student answered incorrectly three times before answering correctly.
  5. The Solution tab is for your reference only, and does not tell you whether the student has viewed the solution, nor does it represent an entry by the student.
  6. The timestamp of the student's Last Attempt on the assignment is shown along the top, as well as the Due Date and the Overall Score.
    example assignment with last attempt timestamp labeled

Resetting work: Individual student

  1. From the Grades page, click on a score.
  2. Navigate to different questions using the left sidebar (if applicable), or by using the Next and Previous buttons at the bottom right, or the Map at the top. 
  3. Click Question or Assignment to reset that component for this student.
    example assignment with reset buttons circled
  4.  Click Confirm.
    Example confirmation: Are you sure you want to reset question 3 for Albert Einstein?

Note that if the assignment is timed and a student's time has already expired, resetting a question will not allow them to continue working. But, you may reset the student's entire assignment to restart their time. Similarly, if the assignment is past due, a student cannot continue working even if you reset their assignment or a question within it unless you also give them a due date extension.

Resetting work: Entire class

If you’d like to reset a question for the entire class, you'll need to remove that question from the assignment then re-add it.

If you'd like to reset a whole assignment for the entire class, you'll need to make a copy of the assignment, then delete the original (or, keep the original and set the gradebook to take the higher of the two scores). Your TechTA can assist you with these tasks.

Flash-based assignments  support both types of score edits described in Editing Grades (overall assignment scores and individual question scores). For mobile assignments , edits to the overall score are possible as described in Editing Grades, but editing individual question scores is not yet available. 

You can edit a student’s score on an entire activity or on an individual question within an activity.

Edit overall activity score or category score (i.e., a cell in the gradebook)

Here's how to edit a cell in the gradebook. It is recommended that you wait until after the due date to edit grades in this manner because the student's score will become "locked". That is, the student's score will no longer increase as they continue working.

  1. From the main course page, click Grades
  2. Click Turn editing on in the upper right corner. 
  3. Enter the desired score in the desired cell or cells.
  4. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Update.

Or, if your cursor is still visible in the cell you just typed in, you can hit Enter on your keyboard to save.

Edit individual question score (i.e., a single question for a single student)

Here's how to edit a the score on a single question for a single student. This can be done before the due date, but you may want to wait until the student is finished with all parts of that question.

  1. From the Grades page, click on a score.
  2. You are now seeing the instructor view of a particular student’s assignment, which does not have the same functionality as the student view. The primary difference is that instructors always have the solution tab available but no check-answer button.
  3. Click the pencil icon to edit a score.
    The pencil icon has a mouseover tooltip of "edit scores".
  4. Enter the desired score (from 0 to 100) and click the Save icon.
    The save icon has a mouseover tool tip of "Save changes".

Resetting student attempts on mobile-friendly assignments is done via the statistics page.

  1. Click Grades, then click on the name of an assignment in a column header. Or, click the bar-graph icon Go to stats icon in the activity editor .
  2. Click Reset Attempts in the upper right corner of the page.
  3. Click the [x] in a cell to reset a single question for a single student. Click the [x] at the far left to reset the whole assignment for a single student. Or, click Reset entire assignment for all students.
    Click on the [x] to the left of the student name to reset the entire assignment for the student. Click on the [x] in the question box for a student to reset a single question for the student. Or Reset entire assignment for all students
    Example class statistics with reset options turned on.

Flash-based assignments  support both types of statistics as described in Assignment Statistics. Mobile assignments  support only the Student Assignment Statistics.

There are two types of statistics available for each assignment

  • Class Assignment Stats: This data can be used to identify questions or topics where the class is struggling.
  • Student Assignment Statistics: This data can be used to identify who is struggling and for which questions within an assignment.

Class Assignment Stats

Once student begin working on an activity, a Stats column will appear in the activity editor and continue to fill in as students complete questions.

  1. From your course page, click on an activity name.
  2. The bar fills from left to right as students work on the question. The color division within the bar represents the percentage of students who got the question correct vs. incorrect vs. not attempted.
    Example class statistics for a question within the assignment. Correct: 3 students, Avg score: 100%, Avg Attempts 1. Incorrect: 2 students, Avg score: 0%, Avg Atttempts 4. Did not attempt: 4 students.
  3. Hover your mouse over a bar to see details about number of attempts and average score for each subset of students.
  4. To edit which columns are displayed in the activity editor, click on Choose columns to display icon.

Student Assignment Statistics

  1. Click Grades, then click on the name of an assignment in a column header. Or, click the bar-graph icon Go to stats icon in the activity editor .
     
  2. The colored blocks show a student's performance on a particular item.
    Example stats grid with students in the first column and question number in the first row.

     
  3. Hover your mouse over each cell for additional information.
  4. Click on a cell or a student's name to review their answers.

Some of the key upcoming updates to our mobile assignments include:

  • A better user experience with clearer feedback on their progress with individual questions and the assignment as a whole
  • The ability for teachers to view student work for each attempt
  • Increased accessibility for all users
  • Improved speed and stability
  • The ability for our team to make quick changes to any questions in need of edits

In the new assignments, hints and feedback will enter from a right side panel instead of a floating dialog. On the left side, the questions are listed and populate with information on how the student has done with each.

Example assignment with feeback window present.

When a student gets a question correct or gives up on a question in homework mode, a new dialog opens to let them know that they have completed the question and to give them the option to view the solution for that question.

Example assignment with solved confirmation and "view solution" button.

The question modules have been updated to have a cleaner look and improved functionality with screen readers.

Example ranking question.

After a question has been completed, all of the attempts made on that question are shown along the upper right corner of the assignment. The question list to the right also shows which questions were started, which were solved, and how many attempts have been made on each.

Example assignment with attempts counter and solution.

If you want to put your own touch on an existing question, you can duplicate and edit any question in our content bank.

  1. Open an assignment. Any assignment will do, but it's generally more efficient if you choose the assignment to which you plan to add the question when you're done.
     
  2. Find the question you want to edit in our library . If the question is already in the assignment, you can select it and then click the locate button  Locate item in question banks icon to locate that question in the library. If you don't see the question you want in the assignment, click the book icon  to open the Library, then browse through the banks on the left to find it.
     
  3. With a question selected, click the duplicate button Duplicate selected item icon.. The copy will appear at the bottom of the question list since it is sorted by ID in ascending order. If you click the ID header, you can sort by ID in descending order, which will place the newest questions at the top of the list. Tip: Any duplicates you have created will have Source = You.
     
  4. Once you have located the new question, click to select it, then click the Edit button Edit selected item icon.
     
  5. Make the changes you desire. Check all of the tabs of the question in case your change affects them. It's probably a good idea to call your TechTA the first time you do this, so they can walk you through everything and make sure you understand what everything means. Note: The question saves every time you change to a new tab (from Question to Correct, for example).
     
  6. Add your copy of the question to the assignment.
     
  7. Very important: Double-click your question to view and answer it as a student. Always do this to make sure the question works the way you think it does, no matter how certain you are. You might have missed something, and it's always possible you'll find a bug in our authoring. It's far better that you find mistakes before your students do.

You can also edit an existing question to create something brand new. This might be a good idea for your first few questions, so you can see how our feedback and variables work. In some cases, though, it might be easiest to start from scratch.

How to write a question from scratch:

  1. Open the assignment where you want to add the question (any assignment will do, but this way you can assign the question when you're done).
  2. Open the Library by clicking the book icon .
  3. Click the New Question button New question icon.
  4. Select from the list of question types. If you're not sure what type you want or can't find it, don't worry, you can always edit the answer type later.
  5. The new question will appear at the bottom of the list, named "New Question" with a date and time of creation. Click to select it, then click the edit button Edit selected item icon.
  6. Write your question. We recommend including a Solution (the answer), a Correct tab (the answer with tolerance), and at least a Default tab (feedback your students will receive if they get the wrong answer). After you start your first question, it's a good idea to call your TechTA to make sure you didn't miss anything.
  7. Very important: Double-click the question to view and answer it as a student. ALWAYS do this to make sure the question works the way you think it does, no matter how certain you are. You might have missed something, and it's always possible you'll find a bug in our authoring. It's far better that you find mistakes before your students do.
  8. Add the question to your activity.

Any questions you write or edit will be available in any future courses you teach, but they are private to only you.

This 19-minute video will walk you through the basics of writing a question, testing it, then adding it to your assignment.

The following gives a brief description of how to author a simple IBIS question.

After opening the Library and clicking the "create a new question from scratch" button you will be prompted to pick which type of question you would like (short answer, multiple choice, etc.).

1. Choose your question type from a list of basic templates, then click OK. You will then be given a blank template with the type of module you selected. 
2. Start with the Question Tab. Type your question in the text box(es) provided in the template*. 
3. Select Item > Save OR switch to another tab to save your work.
4. Click on the Solution tab. Enter the correct answer and solution feedback. Use text areas and any other modules you would like to show the student how to find the correct answer. The solution tab is meant to serve a similar purpose to a printed solution manual. 
5. Select Item > Save OR switch to another tab to save your work.
6. Click on the Correct tab. Enter the correct answer in the answer space. Then use a text box to add the word "Correct." to the bottom right corner of the screen. You can set tolerances for grading in this tab.
7. Select Item > Save OR switch to another tab to save your work.
8. Click on the plus sign in the upper-right portion of the screen to create a new tab. By default this will add a new Incorrect tab (but you can change it by clicking the x on the tab if you want a different type of tab.
9. Incorrect tabs are used to provide feedback for specific wrong answers. 
Define the specific incorrect answer by entering it in the answer space and provide feedback for it using the text box tool. Add an Incorrect tab for each wrong answer you anticipate.
10. Select Item > Save OR switch to another tab to save your work.
11. Use the Default tab to add a generic response to an incorrect answer. Default tabs behave as "catch-all" tabs to provide some feedback for any wrong answer that is not defined by a specific Incorrect tab.  
12. Select Item > Save OR switch to another tab to save your work.
13. Click the Information tab to map the question to the appropriate section and topic. Enter the question information, such as the title of the question, description, difficulty, etc. Click Save when you are done.

*WARNING - IBIS does not have spell check. You may wish to type your questions in a word processing document first, perform a spell check, and then copy and paste the text into IBIS.

The Text Entry Module is an ungraded module used for question and feedback text. The module editor contains text formatting tools and common symbols.To set a text box, click , then click on the place you want the text box to appear. To refine its display, click the object, and the following menu will appear.

Tools

1. Bold. Highlight text and click this button to make text bold.
2. Italics. Highlight text and click this button to make text italic.
3. Subscript. Highlight text and click this button to subscript text. Click again to return to normal text mode.
4. Superscript. Highlight text and click this button to superscript text. Click again to return to normal text mode.
5. Hyperlink. Highlight text and click this button to add a hyperlink (URL). A window will open, allowing you to enter a destination address for the link.
6. Greek alphabet menus. Click to open the menu of Greek letters, which can then be inserted at the cursor. Both upper and lower case are available.
7. Special character menu. Click to open the menu of common special characters and mathematical symbols, such as the degree symbol, en dash, or plus and minus signs.
8. Create algo. Highlight text or number(s) and click this button to make algorithmic variables.
9. Insert algo menu. Click the arrow to view and select available algorithmic variables from a drop-down menu.
10. Grading status. Indicates that module is static.
11. Revert. Removes changes made to module in current tab.
12. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.

Options

The second tab offers two options for formatting the text box. Click Options, and the following menu appears.

1. Show Border. When this box is checked, a border will be shown around the perimeter of the text area.
2. Autosize. When this box is checked, the Text Area will automatically resize horizontally to fit its contents. When this box is unchecked, the module can be sized by grabbing the handles at the lower left corner.

Special Keyboard Characters

  • To enter an umlaut over the letter O, highlight the letter, hold Ctrl, and type a colon (Ctrl-:).
  • To create a slashed letter O, highlight the letter, hold Ctrl, and type a slash (ctrl-/).

The Graded Text Entry Module provides an answer space for simple text entries. It is ideal for single-word answers, such as vocabulary questions. To set a Graded Text Module in your question, click , then click the place you want your graded text to appear.

Basic Configuration


Refine the display of your Short Answer module by clicking it. The following Tools menu will appear.

1. Subscript. Highlight text and click to subscript text. Click again to return to normal text mode.
2. Superscript. Highlight text and click to superscript text. Click again to return to normal text mode.
3. Greek alphabet menus. Click to open the menu of Greek letters, which can then be inserted at the cursor. Both upper and lower case are available.
4. Special character menu. Click to open the menu of commonly used special characters and mathematical symbols, such as degrees (°) or plus/minus (+/-).
5. Create algo. Highlight text or number(s) and click to make algorithmic variables. When a character string is made algorithmic, it will appear blue.
6. Insert-algo menu. Click the arrow to view and select available algorithmic variables from drop-down menu.
7. Grading Status. Changes the module between  static,  graded, and  interactive.
8. Revert. Removes changes made to this module in the current tab.
9. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.  

Setting Tolerance


Grading tolerance can be set for case and plurals. (Spaces are ignored in grading by default.) To change the tolerance, go to the Correct tab or an Incorrect tab and click on the module to open the Grading options.

In this example, the most liberal tolerances are set; plural or singular forms ("cat" or "cats") as well as upper or lowercase ("Cat" or "cat") will be accepted. Note: “Dogs and cats” is not accepted. The correct word order must be entered.

1. Match Case. When this box is checked, the exact case is required. When it is unchecked, the case of each letter is ignored for grading.
2. Allow Plurals. When this box is checked, both plural and singular forms are accepted.

The Numeric Entry Module provides an entry space for numeric values. The module "understands" math in that various forms of a number will be accepted by the system. For example, 100 and 1.00 x 102 are graded equivalently. The module contains two potentially gradable fields—the numeric entry field and the units field. Each of these can be configured separately, and global options can be set for the entire module.

Additionally, tolerances can be set that allow for rounded numbers to be accepted as correct within a defined range.

Basic Configuration


Module Options

Click anywhere on the edge of the module to open the Options panel. The Options panel contains the following elements:

1. Show units. Shows or hides the units field. To change the units of measure, click the text area Units and type the desired abbreviation.
2. Graded. Sets the grading policy for units. Check to make sure the units field is graded.
3. Use dollar units. Shifts the units to the left of the answer space and uses the dollar sign ($).
4. Revert. Removes any changes made to this module in the current tab.
5. Grading Status. Changes the module between  static,  graded, and  interactive.
6. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.  

Numeric Entry Space Tools


Click in the numeric entry field to open the Tools panel. The Tools panel contains the following elements:

1. Scientific notation. Enters 10 to a blank power for scientific notation. (Shortcut: enter "x" or Shift-8 on the keyboard.)
2. Create algo. Highlight text or number(s) and click to make algorithmic variables.
3. Insert-algo menu. Click the green arrow to view and select available algorithmic variables from the drop-down menu.
4. Grading Status. Indicates that the entry space is always graded.

Units Tools


Click on the word Units to open the Unit Tools panel. The Units Tools panel contains the following elements:

1. Superscript. Highlight and click to superscript text or click to open the superscript editing area (Shortcut: Shift-6). Note: this editor provides a special feature that allows for multi-level superscripting. To escape superscript mode, use the right keyboard arrow or click on the main line.
2. Parentheses. Enters parentheses.
3. Angstrom. Enters the Angstrom symbol.
4. Mu. Enters the Greek letter mu.
5. Ohm. Enters the symbol ohm.
6. Degrees Celsius. Enters symbol for degrees C.
7. Degrees Fahrenheit. Enters symbol for degrees F.
8. Italic. Highlight text and click to make text italic.

Setting Tolerance


Tolerances can be set for Numeric Entry to allow for rounding and approximations. The system defaults to 2% tolerance. A degree of difference accepted as approximately accurate within a problem. To change the tolerance, go to the Correct tab or an Incorrect tab and click on the gray outer portion of the module to open the Grading options. The Grading options include the following elements:

1. Tolerance field. Entry field for percent or numeric tolerance.
2. Infinity. Accepts any number above or below the number entered by the author.
3. Percent. Allows for setting a percent above and below the number entered by the author.
4. Numeric. Allows for setting a numeric tolerance above and below the number entered by the author.
5. Exact. Accepts only the exact number entered by the author.

In this example, any value greater than 4 will be accepted. Because infinity is selected in the (+) field when the answer is marked as 4. The (-) field has a tolerance of 0 so any number lower than 4 will be not accepted. 

The Graded Multiple Choice Module is used to create multiple-choice questions. You can allow students to select multiple correct answers or limit the answer to a single option. The text entry area provides text formatting tools and common symbols. The order of choices can be randomized.

As with most IBIS modules, you can make this module wider by clicking and dragging the bottom-right corner.

Module Options
 

Click on the edge of the module to open its Options panel.

1. Selection Button. Use this button to mark the correct answer. If there is only one correct response to your question, round radio buttons, such as those in the example, are used. Square check boxes (  ) are used when multiple correct answers are allowed.
2. Add a New Item. Adds another text entry space and selection button.
3. Allow Multiple. Selecting this box changes radio buttons to check boxes and allows the student to select one or more correct answer.
4. Randomize Order. Randomizes the order of the choices presented to students.
5. Show Background. When this button is checked checked, entry spaces will have a gray background; when unchecked, the entry space will appear as a field with white background.
6. Revert. Removes any changes to this module in the current tab.
7. Grading Status. Changes the module between static, graded, and interactive.
8. Text Entry Space. Use this area to enter text. Click on the field to open text tools. To delete a text field, click on the field to open the menu, and then click the red x in the upper right corner of the field.
9. Delete. Removes this module from the stage. To delete a single entry, click on its space and click the red x.

Entry Space Tools


Click on an entry space to open its Tools and edit in the space.

1. Remove. Removes the entry space from the module.
2. Grading Status. Indicates that this module is always static.
3. Text Formatting Tools. Format the text with the same options available in the Text Area module.

The Symbolic Equation Module supports a wide range of mathematical symbols and functions. It can be used for static display or graded entry.

When in graded mode:

  • The system uses standard order of operations and recognizes alternative forms of mathematical expressions.
  • It cannot evaluate an expression with an equals sign.
    Good example: "Express force in terms of mass, m, and acceleration, a." and "F=" is static text in front of the answer box so the student just enters "ma". Bad example: "Enter the equation for force." where the entire equation, including the equals sign, is inside the answer module.
  • The equation editor can evaluate up to 4 variables; it is not advised to have more than 4 variables required for a graded entry.
  • This module uses text auto-fill for trigonometric functions to ensure that variant forms are graded correctly. This feature can be turned off in static mode under Options > Auto-Convert.

For those of you familiar with LaTex, you can enter LaTex mode in the Equation module by typing backslash (\).

1. Grab. Select to move contents of module within entry field. Select the tool and then click on the equation and hold while moving the mouse.
2. Subscript. Highlight text and click to subscript text or click to open the subscript editing area (Shortcut: press "shift" and "-" at the same time). Note: this editor provides a special feature that allows for multi-level subscripting. To escape subscript mode, use the right keyboard arrow, or click on the main line.
3. Superscript. Highlight the text and click to superscript it or click to open superscript editing area (Shortcut: press "shift" and "6" at the same time). Note: this editor provides a special feature that allows for multi-level superscripting. To escape superscript mode, use the right keyboard arrow or click on the main line.
4. Greek alphabet menus. Click to open the menu of Greek letters, which can then be inserted at the cursor. Both upper and lower case are available.
5. Special character menu. Click to open the menu of special characters and mathematical symbols, such as degrees and plus and minus signs. (Shortcut: press "shift" and "8" for multiplication symbol.)
6. Roots, fractions, and grouping. Click to open the menu with common mathematical functions for roots, stacked fractions, and grouping characters.
7. Trigonometric functions menu. Click to open the menu with common trigonometric functions.
8. Functions menu. Contains sum, limit, log, pipe, natural log (ln), and natural base (e).
9. Vector menu. Contains average (overbar), vectors (overarrow), and vector components (overhat).
10. Bold. Highlight and click to make text bold.
11. Italic. Highlight and click to make text italic.
12. Create algo. Highlight text or number(s) and click to make algorithmic variables.
13. Insert-algo menu. Click green arrow to view and select available algorithmic variables from drop-down menu.
14. Grading status. Changes the module between static, graded, and interactive.
15. Revert. Removes changes made to the module in current tab.
16. Delete. Removes this module.

The Animation/Image Module can be used to upload image files and display them in IBIS. The module supports both JPEG and SWF image formats. Files up to 100 kB can be uploaded. For Flash files (SWF), both static and dynamic images are supported. Note: IBIS cannot display background color in SWF files.

Image names cannot have periods (.) or spaces in them.

  • Yes: Figure_1-2.jpg
  • No:  Figure 1.2.jpg
To upload an image file, click the Image icon in the top pane of IBIS. Then click in the stage, and a window will open, allowing you to browse files to upload.  

1. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.
2. Revert. Removes changes made to module in current tab.
3. Grading Status. Indicates that the module is static. In graded modules, clicking on this button changes the module between static, graded, and interactive.
4. Upload Image. Opens a dialog box to select and load an image file.
5. Show Border. Adds a border around the module.

The Graph Module allows teachers to create graphs which can either be static or graded. To add a graph, click , then click the area on the question tab you want your graph to be.

Options

1. Delete. Removes this module.
2. Grading status. Changes the module between static and graded.
3. Revert. Removes changes made to module in current tab.
4. Graph options.
    a) Hide or show the background grid.
    b) Hide or show axes or axes values.
    c) Change the unit of numbers shown at intervals on the axes.
5. Graph window
    d) Use the "min" and "max" to change the minimums and maximums of axes. 
    e) Allow or restrict a student from placing new objects on the graph.
6. Add a new equation. Add a mathematical equation and have it graphed (as you would in a graphing calculator.)
7. Upload point data. Paste or enter data points to be added to the graph.
8. Tools.
    f) Zoom in & out on the graph.
    g) Select a point on the x or y-axis.
    h) Pan around the graph.
    i) Draw a line on the graph.
    j) Draw a curve on the graph.
    k) Draw a polygon on the graph.
    l) Add a point on the graph.
    m) Change color.

The Table Module is meant for static display of data. It has no interactivity for students and cannot be used for graded input. Data can be entered directly or imported into the table from a delimited source. Acceptable delimiters include commas and periods. The table has text formatting tools and common special characters for customizing the display of your data.

To set a table, click , then click on the place where you want your table to appear. To refine the display of the table, click it. The following menu will appear.

1. Text formatting tools. Used to format text and add symbols. Refer to the Text Area module description above for a complete description of these tools.
2. Row status. Displays the number of rows in the table. Use the up and down arrows to add or delete rows.
3. Column status. Displays the number of columns in the table. Use the up and down arrows to add or delete columns.
4. Import data. Used to import data into the table. Delimited data can be pasted into the Import Data window and then loaded into the table.
5. Insert row. Inserts a row above the current selected row or at the bottom if no row or cell is selected.
6. Insert column. Inserts a column to the left of the current selected column or at right if no column or cell is selected.
7. Delete Row. Deletes the currently selected row, or deletes the bottom row if no row or cell is selected.
8. Delete Column. Deletes the currently selected column, or deletes the rightmost  column if no column or cell is selected.

The Bar Graph Module is meant for static display of data. It has no interactivity for students and cannot be used for graded input. To add a static bar graph, click ​, then click the area on the question tab where you want your graph to be.

You have three choices for the style of your graph: normal, grouped, and stacked. Select one.

Next click the words "Add datapoints." This will bring up a list of tools.

Bar Properties:
    1. Use the "Label" section to type in how you would like the bar to be labeled.
    2. Use the "Amount" section to enter the value for the bar.
    3. Select the color of the bar.
    4. To add the next bar click "Add New Bar."
    5. To select a different bar click on the bar you wish to change on the graph.

Graph Properties:
    1. Select the bar you wish to change by clicking on it on the graph.
    2. Use "Bar alpha" to make the bar more or less opaque.
    3. Use "Bar width" to make the bar wider or narrower.
    4. If you choose to use either the "Grouped" or "Stacked" graph styles, you will also have the option of adding or removing groups under the graph properties section.

*By clicking revert  you can remove changes made to the module in the current tab.*

The Pie Chart Module is meant for static display of data. It has no interactivity for students and cannot be used for graded input. To add a static pie chart, click , then click the area on the question tab where you want your graph to be. Click on the module to drop down the menu as seen below.

Next click on the Options tab. This will open up a menu as seen below.

Options


1. Title your first slice using the "Label" section.
    2. In the "Amount" section enter the percentage (out of 100%) you would like represented in this slice. 
    3. Choose the color of the slice.
    4. Click "Add New Slice." This should make the slice appear in the window. 
    5. Continue making slices by repeating the steps above. The "Free," "Used," & "Total" counts at the top of the menu keep track of the values you have entered so far.
    6. If at anytime you wish to make changes to an existing slice, you can click on that slice in the window and then continue editing it.
*By clicking revert  you can remove changes made to the module in the current tab.*

Tools 


By clicking back to the "Tools" tab you can change the overall appearance of the chart by adjusting opacity, depth, and angle of the chart. 

The Chemical Equation Module supports special formatting and symbols used in chemical equations, such as multi-level subscripts and stacked superscripts and subscripts for nuclear chemistry. It can be used for static display or for graded entry.  

1. Grab. Select to move contents of the module within the entry field. Select the tool and then click on the equation and hold while moving the mouse.  
2. Superscript. Highlight text and click to superscript it or click to open the superscript editing area (shortcut: press "shift" and "6"). Note: this editor provides a special feature that allows for multi-level superscripting. To escape superscript mode, use the right keyboard arrow or click on the main line.
3. Subscript. Highlight text and click to subscript it, or click to open subscript editing area (shortcut: press "shift" and "-"). Note: this editor provides a special feature that allows for multi-level subscripting. To escape subscript mode, use the right keyboard arrow or click on the main line.
4. Isotope. Allows for mass numbers and atomic numbers to be written as stacked and generates super-subscripts for nuclear chemistry.
5. Stacked fraction. Converts mainline fractions to stacked fractions.
6. Bonds. Inserts a double bond at the cursor.
7. Multiplication dot. Inserts multiplication or hydrate dot at the cursor, as in Na2B4O7 · 5H2O.
8. Greek alphabet menus. Click to open menu with Greek letters, which can then be inserted at the cursor. Both upper and lower case are available.
9. Physical states menu. Click to select from a menu of standard physical states, such as (aq) for aqueous.
10. Reaction arrows menu. Select from a menu of forward/backward, weighted, and equilibrium arrows. To add a symbol over arrows, place the cursor next to the arrow and use the keyboard arrows to place an entry box above arrows.
11. Create algo. Highlight text or number(s) and click to make algorithmic variables. 
12. Insert-algo menu. Click the green arrow to view and select available algorithmic variables from the drop-down menu.
13. Grading status. Changes the module between  static,  graded, and  interactive.
14. Revert. Removes changes made to the module in the current tab.
15. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.

The 2-D Molecule Module is used to draw static or graded molecules. The molecule editor provides tools for drawing different atoms, bonds, nonbonding electrons, charges, and reaction symbols. Students can be graded according to various tasks, such as selecting an atom and drawing molecules.

To place a two-dimensional molecule in your question, click , then click the place where you want your molecule to appear. The following menu will appear.

Tools

1. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.
2. Revert. Removes changes made to the module in the current tab.
3. Grading status. Changes the module between static, graded, and interactive.

The tools available to authors and students depend upon the drawing mode and grading options selected. See the Options section below to find out how to switch drawing modes and changing grading options. All of the possible tools are described here.

  1. Atom menu. Select from periodic table plus additional labels to place on the canvas. Click on an existing atom to change the label to the selected atom. Double clicking on an atom in the drawing area and typing the desired element can also change atom labels.
  2. Functional groups menu. This option is only available in organic mode. Select from common functional groups. To add a functional group to a compound, select the desired group, and then click on any atom to convert it to the selected group.  
  3. Bond. Click and drag between atoms to add a bond. Or after adding an initial atom, click on the Bond icon and drag to add additional atoms. Click on an existing bond with the Bond tool selected to change between single, double, and triple bonds.
  4. Wedge bonds. This option is only available when chirality is graded. Click and drag between atoms to add a wedge bond.
  5. Charge. Select the Charge tool, then click on an atom. A box will appear in which you can type charges, such as "Mg2+".
  6. Lone electron pair. Select a single or pair of electrons in the Tools bar, then click on an atom. Electrons can be rearranged once placed on an atom by clicking and dragging.
  7. Add/remove hydrogens. This option is only available in organic mode. Use to add or remove hydrogens from a carbon in condensed form. Select either the add  or remove  hydrogen icon.
  8. Curved arrow. This option is only available in organic mode. Select Curved arrow and then click and drag from a bond, lone pair, or lone electron to an atom. Click and drag on the arc to reposition the arrow. The arrowhead can be changed between single and double hooks by clicking on the head.
  9. Graded select. This option is only available when select is graded. Select items for grading. When objects are selected in the authoring environment, students must select them in order to be graded correctly.
  10. Select. Use to select objects. Allows for grabbing and moving objects. Multiple objects can be selected and grouped by clicking and holding while moving over the objects.
  11. Reaction symbols. This option is not available to students. Select from a list of standard reaction and equilibrium arrows and plus (+) sign. Both arrows and the plus sign must be placed between two atoms or molecules. Select the symbol and then click on the first atom or molecule; hold and drag to the next atom or molecule to define the connection.
  12. Eraser. Select the eraser and then click on an object to remove it.

The four possible statements under Grading indicate the grading parameters. These options can be changed in the grading tab. Hovering over the blue ? button highlights which tools students need to use to fulfill the grading parameter.

  1. Hydrogens. This direction to the student indicates whether H atoms on the carbon backbone can be omitted (H atoms on functional groups are still required). When no slash is shown, it indicates that the student must draw all H atoms.
  2. Isometry. This direction indicates to the student that correct isometry must be drawn.
  3. Chirality. This direction indicates to the student that correct chirality must be drawn.
  4. Nonbonding electrons.This direction indicates to the student that nonbonding electrons must be drawn.

Options: Entry Mode

The first setting viewable on the Options tab is Entry Mode. Here you can select between general chemistry or organic chemistry. When the organic chemistry mode is selected, the Add/Remove Hydrogens, Functional Groups, and Curved Arrow buttons are enabled; in organic mode, structures are always shown in line-bond form. In general chemistry mode, the Add/Remove Hydrogens, Functional Groups, and Curved Arrow buttons are disabled, and the Line-Bond option is enabled.

Note: when in organic mode, it is strongly recommended that you uncheck the nonbonding electrons grading option. If you leave this option checked, be sure that the structures drawn in the correct tab show ALL nonbonding electrons.

Options: Display

Display allows you to specify various options in the appearance of the module.

  1. Hide/Show Grid. Controls the display of the background grid. When this option is checked, the background grid will be shown.
  2. Carbons. Toggles between line-bond and regular structural drawing of carbon bonds.
  3. Snap to Grid. When checked, objects will be aligned to nearest grid lines.

Options: Grading

1. Student Interactions. These tools control student interactions and the tools shown to a student. These also define the grading criteria. For example, if select only is selected, students cannot be graded on drawing a molecule.

  • Draw and select. Allows students to both draw and select.
  • ​Draw only. Allows students to place new objects on the canvas.
  • Select only. Allows students to click on molecules or atoms. 

2. Grading Options. Grading options allow you to select some criteria on which students are graded.

  • Hydrogens. When this option is checked, students must include hydrogens. When it is unchecked, hydrogens will be ignored (unless they are added incorrectly).
  • Isometry. When this option is checked, students will be graded on the isometry defined in the Correct tab. When it is unchecked, isometry will be ignored.
  • Chirality. When this option is checked, students will be graded on the chirality defined in the Correct tab. When it is unchecked, chirality will be ignored.
  • Nonbonding electrons. When this option is checked, students will be graded on entering the nonbonding electrons defined in the Correct tab. When it is unchecked, nonbonding electrons will be ignored.

The 3–D Molecule Module can be used to upload PDB files (e.g., from ChemDraw) and display them in IBIS. The module can be static, interactive, or graded. To place this module in a question, click the icon that looks like a ball-and-stick model icon of ball-and-stick model, then click the place you want your molecule to appear.

Uploading a File

After you have placed the module on the stage, click it to open the Options tab. Click Change Molecule. The Upload window appears. Select the desired file from the pick list, then click Finish.

Tools

Use the Tools tab for rotating 3–D molecules through all three dimensions and controlling their grading options.

1. Rotate x-axis. Rotates the image in the x-axis.
2. Rotate y-axis. Rotates the image in the y-axis.
3. Rotate z-axis. Rotates the image in the z-axis.
4. Grading status. Changes the module between static, graded, and interactive.
5. Revert. Removes changes made to module in current tab.
6. Delete. Removes this module.

Grading is based on selection. To define the correct atom or group for selection by the student, go to the Correct tab and click directly on the desired atom or group in the module.

The Orbital Diagram Module enables you to grade student-drawn atomic orbitals. Use buttons to add subshells easily. Clicking within an orbital enables you to toggle between 0, 1, or 2 electrons in a particular orbital. You can choose whether or not to grade, the order in the which the subshells are added, or to place electrons according to Hund's rule.

Tools for orbital diagrams

Tools

1. Delete. Removes this module from the stage.
2. Revert. Removes changes made to module in current tab.
3. Grading status. Changes the module between static, graded, and interactive.
4. Single orbitals. Used to add or remove subshells from the editor.
5. All orbitals. Used to add or remove all orbitals from the editor.
6. All electrons. Used to fill or empty all shells from the editor.

Options

The Options menu allows the user to control the presentation of the orbital diagram. For example, in the following figure, the editor is set to display the orbital string and to allow compressed strings.

Options for orbital diagrams

1. Display orbital string. When checked, this feature displays the electron configuration in addition to the diagram.
2. Allow compressed string. When this box is checked, the configuration will be shown with the noble gas core.
3. Only show orbits lower than: Enables the user to show only orbits lower than a specified value.
4. Ignore orbital ordering. Does not grade the order in which subshells are listed.
5. Ignore electron distribution in shells. Does not grade Hund's rule.

The Sorting Module allows you to create matching questions in which students will drag and sort items into categories. To add a sorting module to your question, click the sorting icon in the toolbar and then click the area on the question tab where you want your module to be. 

You can edit the name of each category (bin) by clicking on the bin title. You can edit the name of each answer (item) by double clicking on the item title. blank sorting tool  

Options

sorting options
1. Number of bins. Allows you to add or remove bins.
2. Number of items. Allows you to add or remove items.
3. Randomize order. Randomizes the order of the choices presented to students.
4. White backgrounds for items. Changes the color of item backgrounds to white.
5. Revert. Removes changes made to module in current tab. 
6. Grading status. Changes the module between static and graded. 
7. Delete. Removes this module.

In a question, there are a series of tabs. When a student encounters a question, it displays the question tab for them. After they hit “Check Answer” it follows the order of tabs in a “If, then” style. For example, if they got the question correct, it displays the correct tab. If they got the question wrong in a way you anticipated (distractor for multiple choice, for example) it displays the incorrect tab specific to that mistake. If it cannot find specific feedback for what they inputted, it goes to the default tab.  
Question

This tab shows the question just as it should appear to students without feedback or answer choices selected. The content of this tab will show up on all the other tabs of the question.

Solution

This tab shows the correct answer and gives a detailed explanation of it. As long as this setting is enabled, students will see this tab when they give up on a problem or get it correct and then click on the solution tab.

Correct

This tab simply shows the answer and the word "Correct" at the bottom. This is the tab that automatically shows when the student submits the correct answer.

Incorrect

This tab shows a specific incorrect answer choice and explains why it is wrong and gives information that should help lead the student towards the right answer.

Default

This tab shows generic information asking the student to make sure they submitted an answer and/or that their current answer is wrong. This tab will be triggered only if one of the other specific incorrect tabs was not triggered.

Information

This tab shows the title, description, difficulty, and cognitive type of the question as well as where it is located in the library.

 

To add a new tab, click on the plus sign  in the upper right corner of the window. This action will replicate the entries of the current tab and create an Incorrect tab.

To change the type of tab, click on the icon next to the tab name.

When creating incorrect tabs the idea is to anticipate the errors a typical student might make. On each incorrect tab you will select an incorrect answer and then explain why that specific answer is wrong and/or guide the students toward the right answer. 

For example, for the question, "What is the product of 2 x 3?" you might expect some students to misinterpret this as "2 + 3." In this case, you could use an Incorrect tab for the answer "5," with specific feedback telling the student that they need to multiply, not add. 

1. To make a new incorrect tab, click the button on the top right hand corner of the screen.
2. Next, answer the question incorrectly on the tab as you anticipate a student doing. 
3. Then using the text box tool, write your response to that incorrect answer (responses should be similar to something you would say to a student in a live tutoring session.) 

  • If you don't have enough room to write your response under the question, remember that you can use the “simple explanation” bin down at the bottom of the screen. 

The information tab influences how questions are organized in the library. You can correlate your activities to a topic (referred to as the "Focus") and categorize them according to question type and level of difficulty.

The prerequisites should include prior sections of the book upon which the topic is based.
1. Title. Enter a title for the question. The title field will not be visible to students.
2. Description. Enter a brief description of the question. The description will not be visible to students.
3. Difficulty. Select the difficulty of the question.
4. Cognitive Type. Select the option that best represents the type of assessment.
5. End of Chapter. Ignore this area.
6. Question Number. Ignore this area.
7. Pass algorithmic variables from parent to child. Ignore this area.
8. Regenerate algorithmic variables. Ignore this area.
9. Focus and Prerequisite. Select Focus and then click on the desired focus for the question. Setting a prerequisite is optional and can be done after setting the focus.
10. Help. Click to access brief instructions on topic mapping.

The solution tab is what the students see if they give up (& don't receive any credit for the question) or get the question right and chose to view the solution (click on that tab). (NOTE: this tab may not be viewable if the teachers have disabled it.)The answer tab should fully explain the answer in a way that students can understand without any outside assistance.
The correct tab is what the students can see if they input the right answer. Generally, the correct tab just has the word “Correct” at the bottom right hand corner. There should be no explanation here, that’s what the “solution” tab is for.

Default tab will be displayed to students who enter anything that is not defined in a Correct or Incorrect tab. Think of it as a catch-all. Incorrect tabs are used to give specific feedback for a defined incorrect answer. Of course, since the possible number of wrong entries in most modules is very large, you would also want to have a Default tab with general feedback. When all of the possible incorrect answers can be predicted, such as in a multiple-choice question, you might want to omit a Default tab or use it only to tell the student they didn't select an answer.

The eye icon is available on graded modules in Incorrect tabs and is only useful when you have multiple graded answer modules within the question.

The tab will only trigger if the student's answers matches all of the modules with an open eye.
The tab can still trigger regardless of what the student puts for the modules with a closed eye.

Suppose you have a multi-part question, and want to give feedback a specific wrong answer in part 1. Leave the eye open  on the answer module for part 1 and enter the specific wrong answer that you want give feedback for. On all the other answer modules, click the eye to "close" it . Now, this tab will trigger when the student's answer matches what's in part 1, regardless of what they put for the other parts. Add a text area (and any other relevant modules) to explain what the student should do to fix their incorrect answer in part 1.

 

Although either module can be used for numeric answers, the Numeric Entry module has some features that make it ideal, in most cases, for dealing with numbers.

The Numeric Entry module is able to interpret the value of a number and accept alternate forms. For example, 100 and 1.00x102 are graded equivalently. By contrast, the Short Answer module interprets numbers as strings of characters and will grade 100 as incorrect if 1.00x102 is defined in the Correct tab. Additionally, in the Numeric Entry module, you can set a tolerance, or a degree of difference accepted as approximately accurate within a problem that allows for rounded numbers to be accepted as correct within a defined range. For example, if you were to ask what 1 divided by 3 is, the correct answer would be a number with infinite decimals, 0.3333... By using the Numeric Entry as an answer space, you can enter 0.33 as the correct answer and set a tolerance that will accept, 0.33, 0.333, 0.33333, and so on.

  1. Place a Text Area on the stage.
  2. Enter text.
  3. Highlight the text to be hyperlinked.
  4. Click URL in the Tools menu. This will open the address entry box.
  5. Enter an address in the address field and click Done.
  1. Log into the app on your mobile device.
  2. Click the name of your course.
  3. Click on the assignment that you'd like to extend.
  4. If a due date exists, it will be displayed at the top. If no due date exists, you can set one as described in step 7 below.
  5. To extend the existing due date, first select Classwide or Student.
  6. If you chose Classwide, you can go straight to setting the date as described in step 7. If you chose Student, you'll first need to click the name of a particular student in the class. You may prefer to search for the name rather than scroll through the list.
  7. Click Edit Due Date to specify a day, hour, and minute. Or use one of the bottom two buttons to quickly Extend 3 Days or Extend 1 week relative to the current due date (or relative to now if no due date is set).

Here are the minimum hardware and software requirements for using Sapling Learning.

Hardware

Flash-based assignments can be completed on PC, Mac, or Chromebook. Mobile-friendly assignments may be done on any device with a supported browser (PC, Mac, Chromebook, and mobile devices).

  • 1 GHz processor or faster
  • 512 MB of DDR2 RAM or more

Software

For flash-based assignments, Flash Player 20.x+ is required for all browsers. Verify your Flash version here: http://helpx.adobe.com/flash-player.html
Supported browsers are given below.

  • Chrome 40+
  • Firefox 40+
  • Safari 9+
  • Internet Explorer 11+
  • Microsoft Edge 20+

 

Interactives are digital learning tools that are designed to engage students in scientific inquiry and to enhance their conceptual understanding of difficult topics. The interactives page contains three biology interactives that you can explore to get a direct feel for the dynamic nature of our interactives.

Below is a screen capture video of our Atom Builder interactive, which enables students to build atoms with protons, neutrons, and electrons. In this interactive, students can examine the effect of each particle on the identity of the atom, the charge, and the mass number. The immediate feedback allows students to construct a working definition for each property of an atom.

We currently have over 100 interactives for various science and math disciplines, for use in both high school and college courses, and the list continues to grow. The specific subjects include:

  • General & Introductory Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Astronomy
  • Physical Science
  • General & Introductory Biology
  • Genetics
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Geometry
  • Algebra
  • Introductory Statistics (coming soon)
  • Economics

The interactives page contains a complete list of the interactives by subject, with titles and screenshots. Many of the interactives can be used across disciplines or as review tools in upper level courses.

For many courses, we have already identified any relevant interactives and added them to the course site as optional resources. The interactives appear in blue font with a chain link icon, and include the title of the interactive followed by the word “Lab,” as shown in the example for the Atom Builder interactive below.

The interactives page contains a complete list of the interactives. Each interactive is available for use as a separate activity or within a Sapling Learning assignment. Contact your TechTA to have a link to an interactive added to your course. To find questions for an interactive using the Sapling Interactives taxonomy, see assessing student use.

 

Our interactives are designed to be flexible to meet a variety of instructional goals. Below are some examples of ways to integrate our interactives with instruction to engage students inside and outside of the classroom.

  • Online homework: You can assign questions about an interactive as homework so that students are prepared to apply the concept in class. Many of our interactives enable students to discover relationships before formal instruction on the topic.
  • Clicker questions: You can project an interactive during a lecture and ask students your own prediction question. You can collect student responses and then use the interactive to show students the result and facilitate a classroom discussion.
  • In-class activity: You can have students work in pairs during class to collect and analyze data from an interactive. You can ask students to explain their reasoning and give students an opportunity to practice scientific writing skills.

 

Each interactive has associated Sapling Learning questions that assess student understanding of the concept presented. The questions function the same as our regular problems, with the only difference being the addition of a link to the interactive. Below is an example question for the Atom Builder interactive.

This question prompts students to discover that the identity of an atom only depends on the number of protons in the nucleus. Like all of our questions, it contains targeted feedback to guide students toward the learning objective.

As in the above example, the questions often include art from the interactive to further encourage students to use the interactive as a resource. Many of our questions also include randomization to encourage productive collaboration among students.

The questions for an interactive can either be grouped into a separate assignment around the interactive or integrated into an existing assignment about the topic. In both cases, the assignment will appear in green font with a leaf icon, as shown in the example for the Atom Builder interactive below.

To identify questions for an interactive within an assignment, open the assignment and examine the Topic column. The topic names for interactives end in the word “Interactive,” as shown below. To find more questions to include in an assignment, open the question bank and expand the Sapling Interactives taxonomy. We currently have an average of 5 questions for each interactive. For more guidance, please see Finding Questions and Adding and Removing Questions.

 

We are currently piloting an activity worksheet for use with our Atom Builder interactive, since instructors have told us that this type of resource would be useful for their courses.

The activity worksheet guides students through the learning goals of the Atom Builder interactive. Students are asked to explore the interactive, to describe their understanding, and to make predictions.

Contact your TechTA to have the Atom Builder worksheet added to your course, either hidden or visible to students. A hidden link will appear in gray font with a PDF icon, as shown below.

We are currently evaluating instructor feedback to assess the demand for activity worksheets for other interactives.

Our interactives are developed in HTML5 to enable use on a wide variety of platforms, including tablets, with both touch and mouse input. Below is a list of the operating systems and browsers that we support. Due to small screen sizes, we do not officially support smartphones, although most of the interactives also work on those devices.

Operating systems

  • Windows 7+
  • Mac 10.9+
  • Chrome OS
  • iOS 8+
  • Android 4+

Browsers

  • Chrome
  • Firefox
  • Safari 9+
  • Internet Explorer 11+
  • Microsoft Edge​

On the other hand, the majority of Sapling Learning questions for higher education courses are currently written in Flash. As a result, most of our assignments cannot be completed on mobile devices. Please refer to our System Requirements for more information.

As with our regular activities, if you do not set an available-from and due date, then students can enter any visible assignment and begin working. If you want to restrict access, you can set these dates.

Mobile Due Dates

  1. From your main course page, click on the name of the mobile assignment.
  2. In the upper right corner, click Update this Quiz.
  3. In the Timing section, uncheck the Disable box in the Close the quiz row.
  4. Set a day, month, year, hour and minute for the quiz to close.
  5. Click Save and return to course.

Mobile Available-From Dates

  1. From your main course page, click on the name of the mobile assignment.
  2. In the upper right corner, click Update this Quiz.
  3. In the Timing section, uncheck the Disable box in the Open the quiz row.
  4. Set a day, month, year, hour and minute for the quiz to open.
  5. Click Save and return to course.

NOTE: If a Mobile quiz assignment has both an available from and due date, it will not appear in the Upcoming Events list. To ensure that an assignment is visible in Upcoming Events either

  • disable the available from date once it has passed, or
  • keep assignments hidden, and unhide once they should be available.

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